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walking

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (2): 111–115.
Published: 01 April 2015
... Walks in Too Many Parks, or, What Valerian Couldn’t Cure: The Chronic Careers of “Sir” John Hill Kevin L. Cope Louisiana State University George Rousseau. The Notorious Sir John Hill: The Man Destroyed by Ambition...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 17–42.
Published: 01 April 2020
.... The ubiquitousness of these recurring forms, conjoined with resistance to scholarly theorizing of expression popular across social ranks, leaves their conventions and parameters understudied and deserving of more exploration and analysis. As the psalmist observed, humans feel ourselves to be walking on a fleeting...
Includes: Multimedia, Supplementary data
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 January 2008
... calling himself “The Rambler” tells his readers, “Very few men know how to take a walk.”1 In this implicit claim to authority on the subject of walk- ing, Samuel Johnson’s latter-day readers hear not the belletrist’s custom- ary claim to quotidian knowledge, but the voice of experience. We readily...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 January 2022
... it; refrain from climbing the trees or walking through flower beds, and so on. 37 Beyond official regulations, visitors to any garden tend to follow what de Certeau calls “the law of the place,” and here we may employ de Certeau's famous distinction between strategy, the plan organizing the design...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 93–101.
Published: 01 January 2014
... month. Barchas had been working with a team of programmers and student research assistants at the University of Texas to create an interactive “walk-­through” website that reproduces the experience of visiting a three-­room exhibition of 141 paint- ings by Sir Joshua Reynolds, an exhibit...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 28–42.
Published: 01 April 2017
... emphasize the new regimes of politeness, taste, sentiment, and sensibility that marked the ascendancy of commerce, capital, and the world of goods.12 Walking Humbly with God The breakup of the scholastic or Aristotelian account of virtue proceeded in different ways, via Calvinism, civic...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (1): 70–94.
Published: 01 January 2002
... exercise for health, they were allowed only walking and riding; and in riding they were handicapped by the sidesaddle, which required a balancing act that gendered even that exercise. In the country, shrubberies and long galleries were provided so that they might walk...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (1): 115–120.
Published: 01 January 2022
... of the publishers’ wives played in Swift's publishing, and emphasizes the physical proximity between Swift's own dwellings and his publishers, both in London and in Dublin: frequently, he simply walked over and spent a half day sipping coffee with them. Only when he was across the Irish Sea or at Sir William...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (1): 82–108.
Published: 01 January 2005
... persons, its buildings in ruin, its crowds dispossessed: “The peo- ple who now walked about the ruines, appeared like men in some dis- mal desart, or rather in some great Citty, lay’d waste by an impetuous and cruel Enemy,” John Evelyn wrote in his Diary.2 Evelyn was giving a term to the new...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (2): 60–67.
Published: 01 April 2008
... other interests, Vanessa. His letters to Stella of October and November 1712 were sent to Portrane; he was thus even less likely to have walked out to visit Stella at “her” castle.16 Beckett embellishes the old man’s account as rehearsed by Winnie, with several small details not mentioned...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 97–118.
Published: 01 January 2013
... Magazine cites the middle years of the decade as the worst on record: “The years 1725, 1726, 1727, and 1728 pre- sented scenes of wretchedness unparalleled in the annals of any civilized nation.” 10 Swift witnessed these “scenes of wretchedness” as he walked the streets of Dublin. The opening...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 72–91.
Published: 01 January 2024
...., is enlarged and improved (Cambridge: John Nicolson, 1783), Huntington, HM 79057. Courtesy of the Huntington Library, San Marino, California. Gray and Ingold are both inspired by and refer to Paul Klee's conception of a line that has “gone for a walk,” “ ‘an active line on a walk, moving freely without...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (3): 70–98.
Published: 01 September 2003
... description of his Tuscan villa. However, as Walpole reminds us, “the idea soon vanished, lineal walks immediately enveloped the slight scene, and names and inscriptions in box again succeeded to compensate for the daring introduction of nature.” If Pliny’s own record is any indica- tion, what he liked...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (2): 100–105.
Published: 01 April 2024
... to ask these questions, and that in failing to ask these questions, we have missed key aspects of how theatrical culture developed in the eighteenth century, and how intellectual property was understood. She's right. Her book, in equal measures fascinating and conscientious, walks the reader through...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 133–148.
Published: 01 January 2011
... a cheerful place.  — Elizabeth Montagu to Dr. Gilbert West, 16 October 17551 We went on Saturday to visit Mr Godschall & his wife. they are comical people. They have legs, & thick ones too, which they don’t use, for they scarce so much as ever walk down stairs, hands that they do nothing with, eyes...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (3): 80–82.
Published: 01 September 2015
... from a very large number of people from all walks of life. Caradonna estimates that 12,000 to 15,000 people participated in the contests between 1670 and 1794. He writes, “These figures suggest that academic prize contests were one of the largest venues of formal intellectual exchange before...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 102–118.
Published: 01 January 2011
...,” as the following entry from 17 June 1712 illus- trates: “Do you ever read; why dont you say so; I mean does Dd read to ppt. Do you walk. I think ppt should walk to Dd, as Dd reads to ppt. for ppt oo must know is a good walker; but not so good as pdfr” (2:542). We can see here the way in which...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (3): 114–117.
Published: 01 September 2015
...–99), an extraordi- nary document that manages to depict every building in the city. On the sur- rounding walls are captions and photographs of important locations in both Georgian and modern London: Covent Garden, Bloomsbury, and so on. The guide leaflet even includes a short walk to Lincoln’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 115–118.
Published: 01 January 2016
... constructs and then walks across, one breathtaking close reading or daring homology at a time. The more tenuous (in that word’s etymological sense) the cable, and the deeper and wider the apparent gulf, the greater the critical glory. I found myself applauding in the book’s margins as MacKenzie...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 94–111.
Published: 01 April 2018
... walking on Bond Street, Burney bumped into the two Cambridge brothers, one of whom, Charles, walked with her and spoke to her “naturally,” while the other, George, walked on ahead, silent. The “very embarrassed short conversation” ended when “Mr. G. hastily pushed his Brother, saying come this way...