1-20 of 75 Search Results for

venereal

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (2): 1–23.
Published: 01 April 2021
...Marie E. McAllister In seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England, the Grand Tour, sex, and venereal disease became almost indivisible in the public imagination. The Grand Tour was an essential element of a well-born man's education. Yet a persistent belief developed that continental travel...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (1): 22–44.
Published: 01 January 2000
... venereal disease, and include everything from serious science to the wildest mythmaking. Some, I will argue, strength- ened the medical profession by offering theoretical grounds for changing treatment practices and by presenting readers with a vision of medical progress. At the same time...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 21–68.
Published: 01 January 2004
... virulent strain of venereal disease. The Cultural History of Dentistry According to Roger King, the modern practice of dentistry emerged in France during the beginning of the eighteenth century as practitioners began to distinguish themselves not only from mountebanks and crude tooth- drawers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (1): 72–84.
Published: 01 January 2003
... long and tight foreskin or “impure coition” (that is, venereal disease). The first line of treatment was medication (ointments, cold compresses, fomentations, etc followed by an operation analogous to circumcision if that failed.17 This is fair enough as far...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 41–47.
Published: 01 September 2010
... that writing precedes speech, and that the act of writing is itself performative: it enacts an identity that is always already fictitious. Russett’s study shuttles back and forth between a historicist’s project and a postmodernist’s venerable truths. If the reader believes these truths are indeed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 135–148.
Published: 01 January 2012
... veneration. He has long outlived his century, the term commonly fixed as the test of literary merit. Whatever advantages he might once derive from personal allusions, local customs, or temporary opinions, have for many years been lost.1 Having passed the three-­hundredth anniversary...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 38–55.
Published: 01 April 2018
... the natural conclusion to a long-standing veneration. Burney’s admiration of Johnson, his elder by seventeen years, had begun early. At the age of twenty-two, when his wife-to-be was pregnant with their ‹rst child, Bur- ney had attended the premiere of Johnson’s tragedy Irene at Drury Lane. He enjoyed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 107–134.
Published: 01 September 2006
... chaste? Did “true copula- tion” take place, or was there no “venereal congress” at all, with the queen’s eggs being “impregnated” by nothing more than “a vivifying aura, exhaling from the body of the males, and absorbed by the female”?32 The potential for scandal, titillation, and satire...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 144–147.
Published: 01 January 2009
... prostitution, and bawdy houses were located throughout the city, not just in the port area. People from all classes, women as well as men, regularly enjoyed casual sexual behavior, and a permissive atti- tude continued relatively unchecked until the nineteenth century, despite an explosion in venereal...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 125–128.
Published: 01 January 2013
... not have shifted the places where the accent falls in certain words, and he could not possibly have written so many lines without the elegance of end stops. In the next century, Romantic critics like Coleridge so venerated the greats of English literature that they regarded every word as perfectly...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (1): 103–107.
Published: 01 January 2000
... universally to temples, and only selectively to theatres. The Coliseum, for example, is much more likely to have been the victim of time than of religious rage. Indeed there is evidence that primitive Christians venerated as a sort of cenotaph, as witness this legend about Gregory the Great...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 93–97.
Published: 01 January 2012
... theories of personal identity (Locke and Hume, say), with recent work on eighteenthcentury English identity, such as Dror Wahrman’s Making of the Modern Self   (2004), which is briefly cited in a footnote, or with venerably dusty accounts — Stephen Greenblatt’s Renaissance SelfFashioning (1980) comes...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 32–55.
Published: 01 January 2017
... as strike the fancy, or are suitable to the capacity of the learner, I would have committed to memory, and repeated slowly, articulately, and distinctly, in the presence of their instructors, or their fellow-students, or of those for whom they have a veneration and esteem...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 6–11.
Published: 01 September 2010
... disprove her story is not his business. He makes it plain on more than one occasion that he is not trying to offer a solution to venerable disputes, but rather show how conclusions about them were reached. The whole Ossian case is more useful for what it tells us about the eighteenth century...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2010
... it was nonetheless a venerable enterprise. Eighteenth-­century texts granted grafting the status of a liberal art as well as that of an empirical science. Far from viewing it as a routine mechani- cal operation practiced by unsophisticated farmers and gardeners, agrono- mists more and more frequently glossed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 107–112.
Published: 01 January 2012
..., the Parlement de Paris, growing out of the Conseil du roi, or Curia regis, was the oldest and the most vener- able of these courts, and its task was to administer the king’s justice. As the great fiefdoms progressively came under the authority of the French Crown from the late Middle Ages onward...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 121–126.
Published: 01 January 2021
... respected within their assemblage. Today we rate print publication as the most highly esteemed literary activity. However, this value only began to solidify in the middle of the eigh- teenth century, when many authors still venerated manuscript exchange among acquaintances as the ultimate measure...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 1–50.
Published: 01 September 2006
...,” as if to suggest that a lifetime back in Scotland put the trifl ing playfulness of Venice as experienced in one’s youth into a safe and proper perspective (Brown, “Venerating the Venetians,” 95). As I, and others, have discussed elsewhere, Venetian painting of the golden age in the sixteenth century had...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (3): 1–19.
Published: 01 September 2004
... audacity. At the same time, we should recognize that a large part of the play’s appeal, both before and after the Glorious Revolution, derives from its ear- nest creation of a nationalist spectacle that fantastically recasts the Stuart exile as another chapter in the venerable English tradition...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 92–98.
Published: 01 January 2006
... Shakespeare, William. Hamlet, ed. Constance Jordan. Longman Cultural Editions, ed. Susan J. Wolfson (New York: Pearson Longman, 2005). Pp. 288. $8 paper. ISBN 0-321-31729-7 Siena, Kevin P. Venereal Disease, Hospitals, and the Urban Poor: London’s “Foul Wards,” 1600 – 1800. Rochester...