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reader response

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 89–95.
Published: 01 September 2017
... better readers of eighteenth-century novels. One of his examples is the phrase “dispensing power,” which James II claimed in his attempt to remake the monarchy on an autocratic model, and which Samuel Richardson used in a different context while describing Pamela in her “exalted condition.” Further...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 21–46.
Published: 01 January 2021
... appears to be less in making the story credible than in making it moving. Subsequent Assessments Although not republished after the mid- eighteenth century, the Dutch sail- or s account has continued to intrigue readers, but it has evoked very dif- ferent responses. Since 1800, very well-informed readers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (2): 80–110.
Published: 01 April 2012
... that ultimately sustained the Methodist movement and helped to define the faith of individual Methodists. Copyright 2012 by Duke University Press 2012 R Raising the Roof: Hymn Singing, the Anti-­Methodist Response, and Early...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 115–135.
Published: 01 January 2004
... she were cooking in real time— trying to interpret a recipe with bird and spit in hand— characterizes the reader-friendly text, invoking the responsiveness of a master or an interlineated, personalized manuscript.16 Towards the latter part of the century, when cookbooks appealed to mistresses...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (2): 23–64.
Published: 01 April 2010
...Sandro Jung In a reading of James Thomson's The Seasons that largely draws on the history of the book and the fields of print culture and illustration studies, I offer a narrative of the changing interpretation of the poem between 1730 and 1797. Not only did readers, in response to changes in...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (2): 18–38.
Published: 01 April 2011
...Andrew O'Malley In this essay, the author argues that chapbook editions of Robinson Crusoe should be viewed not simply as impoverished abridgments of Defoe's novel, but as striking examples of the popular “appropriation” of an elite text by plebeian readers. The ruthless editorial decisions...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (2): 119–135.
Published: 01 April 2016
... periodical to be composed entirely of questions from readers and responses to them from the editors; it would soon appear twice weekly, hawked in the streets as the Athenian Mercury. These two publications had markedly different styles of presentation—one personal, insistently informal, and often...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 32–55.
Published: 01 January 2017
... appearance in miscellanies, in the form of quotation, imitation, and as an exemplar of a distinctly British poetic identity. It traces the way in which Milton's Paradise Lost is quoted from in these collections, and explores how his poetry was read aloud, and for what purpose, by so-called “ordinary” readers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Gillian Skinner The idea that Burney features in her own journals and letters as a novelistic heroine is something that readers over the years have noted and attributed variously to straightforward egotism or to a need for compensation. In this article, I read narrative performances Burney produced...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 179–196.
Published: 01 January 2017
... many of the guides to public speaking name these as potential readers. Elocution was also a way of rising socially. In the 1750s, oratory became the craze for tradesmen and apprentices who formed the amateur spouting clubs, which provided a responsive audience to aid the aspirant speaker.7 The...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 142–157.
Published: 01 January 2017
... identification of an author. Any reader who wished to identify which works in a miscellany had been written by a particular poet often faced considerable difficulties. This article focuses on a small but significant group of poems that challenged miscellany readers interested in knowing whose works they were...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 75–104.
Published: 01 April 2014
... humans’ and animals’ responsibility and responsiveness to each other. Copyright 2014 by Duke University Press 2014 R “Doubt Not an Affectionate Host”: Cowper’s Hares and the Hospitality of Eighteenth-­Century Pet Keeping...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 57–88.
Published: 01 September 2017
... critic can help new readers to recognize and appreciate. Sophia is about to dismiss her comically misnamed maid Honour who shrewdly preserves her place by telling Sophia what she wants to hear— Tom adores her. Honour describes Tom’s dreamlike response to Sophia playing the harpsichord and to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2021
... do not find happiness until they discipline themselves to be more benevolent toward people of all ranks. Although the novels do not advocate a political solution for ending poverty, Austen suggests that her readers can improve society through benevolent action. Copyright © 2021 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (2): 64–91.
Published: 01 April 2009
... dichotomous one offered its readers an alternative to imagining a middle class. Duke University Press 2009 R Representations of the Social Order in The Gentleman’s Magazine, 1785 – 1815 William Stafford...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 30–63.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Walter Scott after, Edgeworth adopted a technique that rendered her novel an inaccurate account of Anglo-Jewish life and that disappointed her readers; Harrington finally managed only to depict Jewish assimilation instead of achieving Edgeworth’s initial aim of fostering tolerance for Jewish difference...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (1): 56–72.
Published: 01 January 2010
...Richard Frohock First published in Dutch in 1678, Alexander Exquemelin's Buccaneers of America ( Americaensche Zee-Rovers ) presented European readers with a novel and shockingly candid portrait of the international band of sea rovers operating throughout the Caribbean and along the coastlines of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (2): 1–25.
Published: 01 April 2013
... limited and contingent nature of female ownership. By following the movement of these containers, readers can trace the shifting power dynamics that property creates between people and, thereby, the influence that property has on constructing, expressing, and containing identities. Copyright 2013 by...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (3): 60–80.
Published: 01 September 2011
... culture” to “recipient of commodified literature who reads poetry to train his or her moral response” (6). In the case of Scotland, this shift also resulted in repositioning the reader from acting as a “collaborative participant” in national collectivity in Watson’s Collection, to serving as a...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (2): 60–79.
Published: 01 April 2012
... imagine and promote an idea of civil society governed by norms of a benevolent “politeness.” One function of the new culture of politeness was to reconcile readers to the massive increase in military activity. This essay will explore the process of reconciliation in the two most influential periodicals of...