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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 115–135.
Published: 01 January 2004
...Sandra Sherman The College of William & Mary 2004 “The Whole Art and Mystery of Cooking”: What Cookbooks Taught Readers in the Eighteenth Century Sandra Sherman University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (2): 87–91.
Published: 01 April 2015
...William Walker Review Essay Aroused Yet Thoughtful: Readers in Eighteenth-Century Britain William Walker University of New South Wales Kathleen Lubey. Excitable Imaginations: Eroticism...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (2): 18–38.
Published: 01 April 2011
...Andrew O'Malley In this essay, the author argues that chapbook editions of Robinson Crusoe should be viewed not simply as impoverished abridgments of Defoe's novel, but as striking examples of the popular “appropriation” of an elite text by plebeian readers. The ruthless editorial decisions...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 89–95.
Published: 01 September 2017
... better readers of eighteenth-century novels. One of his examples is the phrase “dispensing power,” which James II claimed in his attempt to remake the monarchy on an autocratic model, and which Samuel Richardson used in a different context while describing Pamela in her “exalted condition.” Further...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 197–212.
Published: 01 September 2021
... by editors in the middle decades of the eighteenth century. It was, variously, a space in which to preserve poetry, to test readers’ appetites for the unfamiliar, and to establish or challenge poetic taste. Most of all, however, the verse miscellany functioned as a virtual space of the Enlightenment...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 32–55.
Published: 01 January 2017
... appearance in miscellanies, in the form of quotation, imitation, and as an exemplar of a distinctly British poetic identity. It traces the way in which Milton's Paradise Lost is quoted from in these collections, and explores how his poetry was read aloud, and for what purpose, by so-called “ordinary” readers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 142–157.
Published: 01 January 2017
... identification of an author. Any reader who wished to identify which works in a miscellany had been written by a particular poet often faced considerable difficulties. This article focuses on a small but significant group of poems that challenged miscellany readers interested in knowing whose works they were...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 179–196.
Published: 01 January 2017
... the relationship between the practical, educational, and aspirational uses of poetry, and the formation of a literary canon. Recitation miscellanies not only showed readers how to achieve affect, but they also gave them collections of literature to appreciate, and some introduction to the terms on which those...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (2): 23–64.
Published: 01 April 2010
...Sandro Jung In a reading of James Thomson's The Seasons that largely draws on the history of the book and the fields of print culture and illustration studies, I offer a narrative of the changing interpretation of the poem between 1730 and 1797. Not only did readers, in response to changes...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 1–17.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Gillian Skinner The idea that Burney features in her own journals and letters as a novelistic heroine is something that readers over the years have noted and attributed variously to straightforward egotism or to a need for compensation. In this article, I read narrative performances Burney produced...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 3–19.
Published: 01 September 2017
... in the twenty-first century, intended for the “general reader,” must negotiate charges of imposing a reductive grand narrative whose scholarship is rapidly outdated on one hand, and of working with too small a sample of texts to make historical claims on the other. The advent of electronic databases...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 57–88.
Published: 01 September 2017
...Howard D. Weinbrot Like other earlier authors, Fielding and Richardson place culturally shared “codes” in their texts and exploit those codes for their readers' instruction and delight. The historical critic uses multiple approaches to reclaim what our ancestors knew and what can enlarge modern...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 136–157.
Published: 01 April 2020
... to be destroyed, such as Guy Fawkes. The article will examine what ways effigial images found in broadsides and books lay claim to the reader or viewer’s attention, and explore how are they used to communicate complex meanings about memory and erasure, even in inexpensive ephemeral publications. Copyright 2020...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (3): 51–74.
Published: 01 September 2020
... and conflict. In this article, I examine the polemical nature of Robinson Crusoe ’s spatial experience and constructions, maritime and insular. Most readers know Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe for the shipwreck and the island. This sells short the novel’s formal spatial design, which contrasts its hero’s early...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (3): 75–95.
Published: 01 September 2020
...Lynda Mugglestone Books, as Samuel Johnson stated in 1754 in his Dictionary of the English Language neared completion, always exert “a secret influence on the understanding” so that the reader is informed in both overt and covert ways. Reference works, he stressed, were no exception. As this essay...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 21–46.
Published: 01 January 2021
... versions and with what those changes might tell us about shifts in expectations of fiction readers between 1726 and 1740. It also examines how later critics have responded to the story to demonstrate that ideas about credibility are relative and socially determined. While narrative theory generally argues...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 75–94.
Published: 01 January 2021
... do not find happiness until they discipline themselves to be more benevolent toward people of all ranks. Although the novels do not advocate a political solution for ending poverty, Austen suggests that her readers can improve society through benevolent action. Copyright © 2021 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (2): 113–142.
Published: 01 April 2022
... argument that examines Ruthinglenne 's straddling of fact and fiction; by analyzing both the novel and its paratexts, I propose that Kelly's fictional encoding of fact would have been obvious to at least some of her readers. The case of Ruthinglenne , I further argue, lends support to recent critical...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 30–63.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Scott after, Edgeworth adopted a technique that rendered her novel an inaccurate account of Anglo-Jewish life and that disappointed her readers; Harrington finally managed only to depict Jewish assimilation instead of achieving Edgeworth’s initial aim of fostering tolerance for Jewish difference...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (2): 119–135.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Peter M. Briggs Dunton's journalistic Athenian Mercury and his proto-novel A Voyage Round the World , both from 1691, imply through their strategies of presentation significantly different ideas of authorship. Experimenting with a participatory format that paired readers' questions on a variety...