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rapture

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
...Robert A. Erickson The essay examines Pope's entire poetic career under the aspect of rapture, in all its many connotations and contexts. Though Pope's early amatory poems and his later satire are usually considered in isolation from each other, this essay explores their common preoccupation...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 39–61.
Published: 01 January 2007
... questionable, represents him sharing in the accurst Rapture. This Master of the Pleasures to Nero introduces a P-th-c, (meaning Pathic) who, over and over enj-y’d (meaning enjoyed) urges on the detestable Lewdness.7 All the Story is so high Colour’d, and Strikes with such strong Delineation, I shall...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 106–110.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., not forced; like Poets unconstrained Heats and Raptures; such is mine, rather a running Discourse than a Grave-paced Exactnes; having in them this Formality of Essayes (as Sir W. Cornwallyes saith of his) that they are Tryals of bringing my hand and Fancy acquainted in this using my Paper...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 32–55.
Published: 01 January 2017
... titles. As well as several excerpts from Paradise Lost, it prints three sections from Comus. The first excerpt is, like much of Milton’s poem, about the power of the voice to elicit emotional response: it records Comus’s rapture at hearing the Lady speak for the first time—“Can any mortal mixture...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 72–96.
Published: 01 January 2013
... the growing Passion, she at last flings her self into imaginary Raptures and Extasies; and when once she fancies her self under the Influence of a Divine Impulse, it is no wonder if she slights Human Ordinances, and refuses to comply with any established Form of Religion, as thinking her...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 130–136.
Published: 01 September 2014
... Young’s comments that the ode “‘should be rapturous, somewhat abrupt, and immethodical’” in its conduct (30)—makes it a productive refer- ence point for generic experiments that emphasize modal rather than struc- tural features. The examples Jung uses, by Collins, Warton, and Scott, among others...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 158–164.
Published: 01 September 2014
... immediate pleasures and cultural progress, and so use taste to criticize the very ideological constructs that many scholars think it upholds” (4). In his reading of Evelina at the opera, for example, Noggle focuses on a single moment of absorption, Evelina’s surprised rapture at the singing...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (3): 52–82.
Published: 01 September 2022
... in changes of fortune with concomitant expressions of hope, angst, despair, and rapture. In their larger design, most of the operas present a clear act-by-act mood sequence, sometimes alternating up-and-down with almost dizzying rapidity, sometimes less hectic in their changes of fortune. In Ariodante...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 22–38.
Published: 01 January 2007
... designs to ravish or seduce.22 But, as Cannon notes, the Eumolpus story off ers a twist on the traditional pattern: “We commonly conceive the Pathic’s Part disagreeable; But Petronius, whose Experience is hardly questionable, rep- resents him sharing in the accurst Rapture.” Eumolpus at fi rst thinks...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (1): 114–124.
Published: 01 January 2010
... and now than in the memory of past raptures and the vision of future pleasures. Romantic aesthetics, as theorized by Coleridge and the German idealists, depends on a joy that is “participated in” but not “pos- sessed” (139). The narrator of Coleridge’s lyric poems sympathizes with the joy rather...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 36–67.
Published: 01 September 2016
... not so blameable when they contemn [sic] those puny gentlemen, who acquire such skill in this charming art, as to feel its minutest niceties, and be of course in rapture with the languishing Cecchina’s of Piccinni, and the fainting Pastorella’s of Galuppi” (Account, 1:293). His reference here...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 38–55.
Published: 01 April 2018
... Pleasure, I 44 Eighteenth-Century Life had almost said Rapture, than any Production of equal length I have ever read” (Burney to Johnson, October LCB, There is much more in the same vein, and the heavily revised and interlineated draft of the letter shows the pains that Burney took...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 83–101.
Published: 01 January 2011
... is in a mighty Rapture, at the News of the French King’s Coronation, that he can hear nothing but Joy and Transport, here’s Loyalty in Perfection” (7). The received view of the Bickerstaff hoax as a harmless jape is at odds, then, with the political interpretation that contem- poraries made so readily...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 168–187.
Published: 01 January 2011
...) Tropes of flight permeated Lunardi’s perceptions at ground level. His moods were as variable as winds, veering from the depths of despondency to the heights of elation: “Does not your mind’s eye behold me, soaring on rapture’s bright wings to the summit of happiness, and laughing at the clouds...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (2): 1–28.
Published: 01 April 2007
...,” which Barrell links to the Duke of Chandos’s com- pliment in January 1789 that Pitt was “a heaven-born minister” (11). In the satire, this political praise is parodied as a fawning deifi cation, with the subtext that such rapture is more characteristic of the superstitious and ser- vile Orient than...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 188–215.
Published: 01 April 2023
... descriptions of the Polynesian peoples that the crew encounter, remarking favorably on their character and clothing, but imposing the conventions of British locodescriptive poetry to depict the beauties of distant islands. His raptures are interrupted by a stanza that calls him back to sea, literally, via...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 106–133.
Published: 01 April 2023
..., to leave any room for . . . classical raptures” (84). This statement is prescriptive rather than descriptive. Why object if readers in fact pay the digression no attention? Irving seems to wish that readers were absorbed but implies that Falconer's digression in reality thwarted such absorption. Clarke's...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 47–74.
Published: 01 April 2014
... necessary for hap- A Study of Three Treatises in Enlightenment Britian  6 7 piness, but sufficient as well. Ultimately, happiness itself has a distinct tenor or character in each of these treatises. For Norris, happiness refers to a kind of ecstasy or rapturous bliss; for Nettleton...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (3): 1–32.
Published: 01 September 2015
... Goldsmith, who is endeavouring to carve the contents of his plate. His stolid features do not express anything approaching to rapturous appreciation of the accomplished blue-stocking’s extraordinary flow of bewitching conversation. (1:160) Thomas Rowlandson’s Vauxhall Gardens...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (2): 88–118.
Published: 01 April 2016
..., And Tacitus, to Bozzy, leave the field! Joe Miller’s self, whose page such fun provokes, Shall quit his shroud, to grin at Bozzy’s jokes! How are we all with rapture touch’d, to see Where, when, and at what hour, you swallow’d tea! How, once, to grace this Asiatic treat, Came haddocks...