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print and periodical culture

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 28–49.
Published: 01 January 2024
... study, his work challenges expectations of gender and class in eighteenth‐century manuscript studies and reveals how the affordances of the pen might reflect the burgeoning print culture of the period. abigail.williams@spc.ox.ac.uk annamara@gmail.com Copyright 2024 by Duke University Press...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 43–77.
Published: 01 April 2020
..., politics, and advertising that typifies the innovative print culture of this period. Copyright 2020 by Duke University Press 2020 prospectus ephemera advertising book trade French Revolution debate Eighteenth- Century Life Volume 44, Number 2, April 2020 doi 10.1215/00982601-8218602...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (3): 55–84.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Danielle Spratt The essay argues that David Garrick and Sarah Siddons—two of the most financially successful celebrities of their time—cultivated their parental public images in print and portrait culture by capitalizing on the level of their participation in benefits for actors and in the Drury...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 67–70.
Published: 01 January 2009
..., such as Tony Barnard’s essay on print culture, a model of schol- arly critique, which wonders about how readers’ imaginations leapt on reading books on the captivity of the Jews, the exploits of the Milesians, or the Battle of Aughrim. The colonial condition of Ireland was experienced, in this sense...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 121–126.
Published: 01 January 2021
..., Carter, and Catherine Talbot put their cultural resources into action (67) to support the print trade, especially the rapidly expanding periodical, and specifically Samuel Johnson s Rambler. Carter was already a celebrated print author by the end of the 1730s because of her own periodical writing...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (1): 29–42.
Published: 01 January 2001
... (1728) was phenomenally popular and established her as a literary figure of national renown. Yet, as the above quotation demonstrates, Rowe lived most of her life apart from the center of print culture and instead lived and worked in the provincial town of Frome...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2024
... periods primarily because of the light they shed on print. 3 With few exceptions, the big story of media for the eighteenth century was largely concerned with the expansion and significance of print culture. 4 Now that those voices arguing for a complex media interpenetration in the period have...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (3): 109–113.
Published: 01 September 2015
... employs a straightforward narrative style and short chapters to make the work accessible to a range of audiences, from art historians and scholars of print culture, to those with a special interest in 1690s London, and to Defoe enthusiasts (he sees Defoe and Collier as kindred spirits...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
... for authors than some have assumed (pp. 109–11). He notes in passing that the period 1730– 1760, often regarded as the final triumph of print over manuscript culture, actually witnessed a decline in new book titles. In short, the momentum of The Work...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 54–81.
Published: 01 January 2012
... culture of theatrical celebrity. While paintings and engraved prints of actors mostly peddled a mode of celebrity that was sustained by audience applause within the theater walls, Bell’s illustrations created a parallel visibility for the performers outside the theater, which was only tenuously...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 262–267.
Published: 01 January 2024
... arguing too strenuously for seeing manuscript culture as an important medium in later periods “after print.” From my perspective, late seventeenth-century manuscript books were a poor fit for twentieth-century publication practices and existing genres. Often the multiplicity of owners, writers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2017
... 4.  Critics have been attuned to the importance of printed miscellanies, anthologies, and commonplace books in the cultivation of period reading habits. See Barbara Benedict, Making the Modern Reader: Cultural Mediation in Early Modern Literary Anthologies (Princeton: Princeton Univ., 1996...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (2): 119–135.
Published: 01 April 2016
... for Women,” Modern Philology 28 (1930): 45–59. Kathryn Shevelow, in chapter 3 of Women and Print Culture: The Construction of Femininity in the Early Periodical (London: Routledge, 1989), discusses at length the insistent presence of women in the Mercury; in particular, she argues that Dunton’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 217–235.
Published: 01 January 2024
... (2012): 463 – 83. For more on Dorothy Wordsworth's commonplace book, DCMS 120, see Michelle Levy, “Bookmaking and Archiving in Dorothy Wordsworth's Notebooks,” in After Print: Eighteenth-Century Manuscript Cultures , ed. Rachael Scarborough King (Charlottesville: Univ. of Virginia, 2020), 95 – 120...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 113–133.
Published: 01 January 2024
... unlike some other orders, the Poor Clares in this earlier period did not regularly mark their volumes with a convent of origin. 17 A brief survey of the printed works that have survived from the Poor Clares’ libraries reveals an eclectic textual culture that tended to customize materials to suit...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (3): 143–147.
Published: 01 September 2019
... fertility of oral culture, which lay behind the printed material that dominates our concep- tion of the period. Print culture was in fact a relatively small culture in an age when about half the population could only read with difficulty, and when a book was an expensive commodity. As Douglas well reminds...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (2): 53–84.
Published: 01 April 2013
... that spanned a period of great cultural change, which saw the introduction of significant technological innovations to the printing trade. In November 1781, the London Courant and Westminster Chronicle announced the publication of the second annual volume of William Pea- cock’s upmarket, illustrated...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 50–71.
Published: 01 January 2024
... that of printed literature in the period, which Mark Vareschi has recently calculated as averaging 21.1 percent through the eighteenth century (and notably, without any decline over the century; rather, Vareschi finds “a steady pulse of anonymous publication with periods of marked increase”). 17 This suggests...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (3): 127–137.
Published: 01 September 2019
...David H. Richter Orr Leah . Novel Ventures: Fiction and Print Culture in England, 1690–1730 ( Charlottesville : Univ. of Virginia , 2017 ). Pp. viii + 336 . $45 Keymer Thomas , ed. Prose Fiction in English from the Origins of Print to 1750 . Volume 1 of the Oxford...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 1–15.
Published: 01 September 2021
... our analytic tools for thinking about the spatial aspects of eighteenth-century culture through a selection of case studies, which chart changing ideas and practices across local, national, and international contexts, from elite London print rooms, to distant Pacific islands. This is to say...