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paige

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 107–112.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Scott Black Paige Nicholas D. ., Before Fiction: The Ancien Régime of the Novel . ( Philadelphia : Univ. of Pennsylvania , 2011 ). Pp. xiv + 285 . $59.95 Copyright 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 Review Essay Misrecognizing...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 21–46.
Published: 01 January 2021
..., this study questions that relationship, at least for the early novel, when narratorial techniques and readerly practices were still being developed.5 Nicholas Paige is one historian of fiction who has recently pondered how fiction and the pseudo-factual narrative became distinct forms over the course...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (3): 127–137.
Published: 01 September 2019
... considers early prose fiction in the absence of any meaningful encounter with narrative theory. It is true that J. A. Downie dutifully refers to Wayne Booth s discussion of Fielding s narrator in his classic Rhetoric of Fiction (1961), and that Ros Ballaster twice taps Nicholas Paige s prize- winning Before...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 133–143.
Published: 01 January 2013
... Worlds: Romanticism, Modernity, and the Emergence of Virtual Reality (Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2011). Pp. xiv + 332. 51 ills. $110 Paige, Nicholas D. Before Fiction: The Ancien Régime of the Novel (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania, 2011). Pp. xiv + 285. $59.95 Pelleport, Marquis de, Anne...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 252–270.
Published: 01 April 2001
..., in The Selected Letters of Ezra Pound 1907–1941, ed. D. D. Paige (London: Faber & Faber 1950), p. 180. 15. Shelley’s Poetry and Prose, ed. Donald H. Reiman & Sharon B. Powers (N.Y.: Norton, 1977), p. 508. 16. “Introductory Discourse,” A Series of Plays...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 49–73.
Published: 01 January 2020
... as an unacknowledged bastard in his uncle s house and begins the plot s drive toward exposure and vindication. The last, the brutal willingness of magistrate Francis Paige to see Tom hanged for a crime he did not commit, in which his silencing of the defense almost verges on collaboration with Tom s enemies, leads...