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nautical language

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 166–187.
Published: 01 April 2023
... and contracting in length like waves, consistent in their inconsistency. Previous assessments of Falconer's works focus on his employment of technical nautical language, or “sea language,” in both his poetic and practical texts. Siobhan Carroll, who is interested in Falconer's depictions of the British empire...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 13–45.
Published: 01 April 2023
... Sorensen, Strange Vernaculars: How Eighteenth-Century Slang, Cant, Provincial Languages, and Nautical Jargon Became English (Princeton: Princeton Univ., 2017), 231. 42. This table of Falconer's reading needs some explanation. It presents a reasonable reflection of his reading and of the literature...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 188–215.
Published: 01 April 2023
... initial encounter with “sailor talk” is another comedy of errors: the foreignness of the sailors’ speech is humorously underscored when the educated hero assumes he is hearing Latin. Although Mitford depicts Johnny as feckless and naïve, his mistake indicates how nautical language isolates the denizens...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 66–86.
Published: 01 April 2023
...@berkeley.edu 22. “Advertisement” to The Shipwreck (1764), sig.1Br. 21. For a discussion of eighteenth-century criticism of technical language and georgic poetry, see Bridget Keegan, “Georgic Transformations and Stephen Duck's ‘The Thresher's Labour,’ ” Studies in English Literature 1500–1900...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 3–12.
Published: 01 April 2023
..., 1750–1850 (Philadelphia: Univ. of Pennsylvania, 2015), 84–92; Margaret Cohen, The Novel and the Sea (Princeton: Princeton Univ., 2010), 120–26; Janet Sorensen, Strange Vernaculars: How Eighteenth-Century Slang, Cant, Provincial Languages, and Nautical Jargon Became English (Princeton: Princeton...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 46–65.
Published: 01 April 2023
..., dangerous, and often fatal. If we consider the tens of thousands of sailors crisscrossing the oceans, it is scarcely surprising that nautical terms and experiences became staples of language, thought, and the imagination. There were other, more political, concerns about disasters at sea—some read...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 January 2020
... attempting to reach shore through heavy surf after their ship had foundered. For example, an extraordinary illustration to Robinson Crusoe . . . Revised and Corrected for the Advancement of Nautical Education (1815) shows Crusoe and his shipmates struggling to get ashore in large surf between the Winterton...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 106–133.
Published: 01 April 2023
..., and read the commentators.” See Johnson on Shakespeare , vol. 7 of The Yale Edition of the Works of Samuel Johnson , ed. Arthur Sherbo (New Haven: Yale Univ., 1969), 111. 30. Janet Sorensen, Strange Vernaculars: How Eighteenth-Century Slang, Cant, Provincial Languages, and Nautical Jargon Became...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (3): 118–127.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Nouvelle Cythère — an updated version of the mythical Isle of Enchantement.19 In a more scientific mode, Bougainville added a brief 1 2 4 Eighteenth-Century Life lexicon of the Tahitian language complete with commentary — a specimen of early cultural linguistics — but the most thoroughly...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 60–75.
Published: 01 September 2007
... in execution . . . a con- stant Resolution, to reject all the amplifi cations, digressions, and swellings of style: to return back to the primitive purity, and shortness, when men deliver’d so many things, almost in an equal number of words.”16 According to Sprat, any surplus language...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (3): 78–97.
Published: 01 September 2002
...David Paxman The College of William & Mary 2002 ECL26307-Paxman.q4.jw 3/25/03 3:32 PM Page 78 “Distance Getting Close”: Gesture, Language, and Space in the Pacific...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 168–187.
Published: 01 January 2011
..., and disappointments. The new word aerostation meant “voyaging through air”; by analogy with nautical travelers, aeronauts were those who sailed in air. But like sea voyages, air voyages took place in a relatively featureless medium. Dis- courses of description for both clouds and waves were in the 1780s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 62–80.
Published: 01 January 2007
... by such circumstances as to be unexampled in the annals of nautical history.” Mutinous Behavior and Its Impact on Civil Society 7 1 He appealed to common standards and trusted that “the world” would receive Edward Christian’s attack on Bligh with the indignation and con- tempt it deserved.13...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 87–105.
Published: 01 April 2023
... , and Bridget Keegan has suggested that Falconer's use of nautical terminology “inscribes . . . heroism” on the sailor who understands such language: it is “a sign of [the mariner's] knowledge and an assertion of the valuation of that knowledge.” 11 The theoretical and practical aspects of seafaring...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (1): 24–45.
Published: 01 January 2002
... world of newspaper puffing was “the properest Theme for the Author of The School for Scandal.” But where that play explored how newspaper gossip created and manipulated reputation, The Critic has a more explicit political focus: language and performance are not only...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (2): 134–165.
Published: 01 April 2023
... visual interpretation The characterization of William Falconer's descriptive long poem, The Shipwreck , as a treasure trove of nautical knowledge, its “value” primarily existing in its “contain[ing] . . . within itself the rudiments of navigation,” obscures the significance of its media-supported...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (3): 23–179.
Published: 01 September 2008
....8 3. Lorenzo Alessandro Zacagni (1657 – 1712), Christian apologist and prefect of the Vatican Library under Pope Innocent XII. 4. The Accademia della Crusca was founded in Florence 1582 to examine the language of Tuscany, define the meaning of words, and indicate good usage. Membership...