1-20 of 91 Search Results for

medievalism

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 32–46.
Published: 01 April 2001
...Adam Potkay The College of William & Mary 2001 Hume’s “Supplement to Gulliver”: The Medieval Volumes of The History of England Difference in Opinions hath cost many Million of Lives...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 74–97.
Published: 01 January 2020
...), looking closely at the role of St. Nicholas, patron saint of gift-giving, who intervenes at crucial moments in the plot. I then reexamine Chatterton’s approach to Walpole in 1769 seeking patronage for his pseudo-medieval “Rowley” poems. Walpole’s infamous rejection stemmed in large part, I suggest, from...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (2): 105–136.
Published: 01 April 2019
..., including Cleland’s interests in ancient and medieval history, and their bearing on eighteenth-century culture. Hal Gladfelder’s Fanny Hill in Bombay (2012) has drawn intriguing parallels between Fanny and the empowered Druidesses who occupy Cleland’s idealized Celtic world. Proceeding from this point, I...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 197–230.
Published: 01 January 2017
... descendants of the medieval fabliau. In the process, it explores a best-selling anthology of them, the Noble brothers' The Muse in Good Humour (1744–85), and the career of Matthew Prior, the greatest contemporary producer of this genre and by far the most prominent English poet between Dryden and Pope. While...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 113–118.
Published: 01 January 2020
... of antiquarian texts, intended to expand the history of English literature to accommodate medieval literature. Jeff Strabone s engaging and ambitious chapter examines how editorial annotations shaped the thirteenth- century chronicle of Robert of Gloucester. Strabone proposes the concept of bardic mediation...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 43–58.
Published: 01 April 2017
...   Eighteenth-Century Life engagement with a variety of eighteenth-century discourses, all invested— in varying ways—in the age’s dominant historiographical trope celebrat- ing extant commercial society as the apogee of social development. These narratives almost invariably represented medieval cultural...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 76–96.
Published: 01 September 2005
... a classical motto, “non omnis moriar,” from Horace, Carmina, 3, 30. Macpherson’s bard is in the wilderness, while Percy’s seems more rooted in the medieval world. There is a gothic spire in the background, a knight in armor in the foreground; the characters and perhaps the bard himself are dressed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 83–96.
Published: 01 January 2009
... originates in the writings of medieval clerks, barons, churchmen, and chroni- clers who wrote about the Arthurian tales that were popularized by Geof- frey of Monmouth’s early twelfth-century work, Historia Regum Britanniae. In “Reflections on Political Literature: History, Theory, and the Printed Book...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (1): 107–112.
Published: 01 January 2014
... to medieval romance that followed on the sixteenth-­century rediscovery of Heliodorus, who was taken as an ancient model for the modern, humanis- tic, Aristotelian “neo-­romance” that would correct the moral impropriety and aesthetic irregularity of medieval romance. Cervantes should be understood...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (3): 45–57.
Published: 01 September 2002
.... As a traveler who is skeptical of the marvelous, but whose narrative discloses vestiges of such bygone notions as monstrous races and the terrestrial paradise, Dampier rides the boundary between medieval and modern ways of comprehending the cos- mos. His intellectual...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 47–74.
Published: 01 January 2021
... Dictionarium devoted most of its headwords to people and places. In keeping with the values of Renaissance humanism, Estienne emphasized classical antiquity, including mythology, though he did deal with biblical, medieval, and even contemporary material. A twenty- five- word article on the city of Paris...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 122–138.
Published: 01 April 2017
... political, social, and economic “distance.” It is quite probable that, in Italian late medieval states, the heirs of deceased “foreigners” did not have their property confiscated, and that the right of escheat was virtually unknown. In Britain, as well, though there were many legal distinctions...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (3): 1–9.
Published: 01 September 2002
... themselves were authentic, they acquired a similar existence to the relics of saints in medieval times: taken out of their proper contexts, they were appropriated by the narratives of those who owned them and who had tamed their potentially frighten- ing otherness...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (1): 28–51.
Published: 01 January 2003
... a consistent account of prose forms. Discussions of prose writing also appear in the classical and medieval rhetorical traditions. Up to the eighteenth century, however, such commentaries employed distinctions adopted from theories of oral discourse. “Antiquity had no general...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (3): 1–18.
Published: 01 September 2000
... and medieval Europe. Via his personal and professional connections with the law courts and these festivities, Dryden would have had ample oppor- tunity to experience something very like the carnivalized view of the world that is also the animating force behind Menippean satire...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 185–200.
Published: 01 April 2001
... had to leave behind most of the Crown Jewels, including the English and Scottish re- galia (there was no separate Irish regalia, because the medieval Anglo- Norman Lordship of Ireland was part of the Kingdom of England). From the moment Louis XIV set them up...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (2): 1–16.
Published: 01 April 2004
... well into the nineteenth century. “If you search for passion,” wrote Lord Byron, “where is it . . . stronger than in the epistle to Eloisa from Abelard.”1 Not only were the letters widely read and imitated, but the tomb of the medieval lovers also became popular as a site of pilgrimage for sensitive...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 147–169.
Published: 01 April 2001
... Adam’s design, as Damie Stillman has pointed out, translated the Gothic forms of its medieval pro- totype into the delicate and complex linear rhythms of the architect’s con- temporary classical designs, the pro- posed coloring was far more...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (2): 43–64.
Published: 01 April 2000
... on the Faerie Queene of Spenser (London: R. & J. Dodsley, 1754), expanded to two volumes in 1762, revealed for the first time the full scope of Spenser’s sources, especially the poem’s kinship with medieval romance, and “was thus perhaps the single most influen- tial study of the poet” before 1900 (David...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 January 2000
... Geoffrey’s vast popularity, his successors, who valued more documented historicity, were not as delighted with Arthur and the other products of his active imagination as their medieval predecessors had been.16 But their dislike was selective. When Polydore Vergil gently criti- cized Geoffrey’s...