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medicine

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2017) 41 (2): 139–153.
Published: 01 April 2017
... Irishness often appear as conjoined energies, suggesting the importance of pathology and its sources—apparent or actual—for the constitution of New South Wales. Copyright 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 Australia convict transportation scurvy Irish medicine...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2011) 35 (1): 208–210.
Published: 01 January 2011
... bibliography, detailed index, and abun- dant notes, testifies to his being an impeccable scholarly author as well. The book contains twenty-seven­ chapters grouped into three parts (“Grass Roots,” “Meatless Medicine,” “Romantic Dinners”) roughly corresponding to the ges- tation, flowering, and spread of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2000) 24 (1): 22–44.
Published: 01 January 2000
... for previous ages, the common elements in these debates were credit and blame: enhancing the prestige of Enlight- Eighteenth-Century Life 24 (Winter 2000): 22–44 © 2000 by The College of William & Mary 23 enment medicine...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2014) 38 (3): 137–144.
Published: 01 September 2014
...- coverage narrative, but that its six chapters, albeit intersecting, are to be under- stood as modular essays showcasing how certain sciences, in particular those related to medicine, impacted on society’s concerns both material and moral: society’s thoughts, writings, actions and interactions; and its...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2013) 37 (2): 110–119.
Published: 01 April 2013
... about charlatans selling their Construing and Deconstructing Swift’s A Tale of a Tub     1 1 5 nostrums” (25). In A Tale, Christianity is yet another form of quack medicine. The “mountebank’s movable stage . . . provides Swift with his master meta- phor, one that levels all. Canonical...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2003) 27 (1): 72–84.
Published: 01 January 2003
...-twentieth-century American medicine, but it was not how eighteenth-century doctors viewed the matter.16 As Cash acknowl- edges in a note, “If only a small part of the prepuce were amputated and mangled by the sash, irregular scar tissue might form, resulting in a phi...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2003) 27 (2): 49–66.
Published: 01 April 2003
... progressively worse. . . . the maniacal countenance or look is a term perfectly well known in medicine and is one of the most decided indications of that distemper.”32 For busy men like Gregory such an approach had much to commend it. He had seen Thom- son only twice, once when he travelled through from...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2015) 39 (1): 212–235.
Published: 01 January 2015
... society. To satisfy his ambitions, Johnson had created a new identity for himself, and Wakley set out to expose the real man who hid behind a false persona. Johnson claimed to have acquired an extensive knowledge of mod- ern medicine, but to Wakley, he was a relic who based his diagnoses on...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2009) 33 (1): 61–66.
Published: 01 January 2009
... concerning taxonomy or the line between botan- ical and animal life. In doing all this, they referred to philosophers and scientists in France and especially in Holland, where, before 1750, so many Scots were educated in science and medicine. The Enlightenment did not spring from the pages of Millar’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2012) 36 (2): 111–142.
Published: 01 April 2012
... Physicians by identifying medicine with aristocratic noblesse oblige. However, Sloane’s famous policy of dispens- ing free advice to the poor — ​a practice claimed by quacks all over London, who then defrauded their customers — ​complicated his identity as a physi- cian. Furthermore, a physician, like...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2006) 30 (3): 107–134.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Cashing in on an infl uenza epidemic that swept through Lon- don in 1782, Katterfelto explained the satanic appearance of his specimens by boasting that they were the very insects that had caused the outbreak. Spooked Londoners rushed to purchase his patented antifl u medicine at the exorbitant price...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2002) 26 (3): 181–201.
Published: 01 September 2002
... referred since antiquity to any plant or animal species that is foreign or imported; and naturalization— which was usually moti- vated by such practical needs as food, medicine, textiles, or dyes— dates from before the beginning of recorded human history (Brockway, 36).9 As...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2009) 33 (1): 67–70.
Published: 01 January 2009
... charts, with easy grace, the many registers of the printed word, mapping the Irish experience onto the trades of provincial England, Wales, Scotland, and colonial North America. His essay is rich with gems, accounts of booksellers making their money as sellers of patent medicines, descriptions of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2007) 31 (3): 127–130.
Published: 01 September 2007
... of Exchange: Commerce, Medicine, and Science in the Dutch Golden Age (New Haven: Yale Univ., 2007). Pp. 562. 60 ills. $35. ISBN 0-300-11796-5 Cooper, Alix. Inventing the Indigenous: Local Knowledge and Natural History in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ., 2007). Pp...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2015) 39 (3): 101–108.
Published: 01 September 2015
...   Eighteenth-Century Life a great prince of the Celtic periphery, the Gaedhealtacht, was never quite so influential. Roger Emerson is an American who moved to a post in a Canadian uni- versity. From 1979, he began to produce articles on the history of science and medicine in the Scottish...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2001) 25 (2): 47–62.
Published: 01 April 2001
... Angli- can pain, Catholic pain, Quaker pain, and so forth; but body pain is the thematic subject of Ingenious Pain and its author went to immense trouble to fathom its secrets. Little is known about the practices and therapies of Quaker medicine, especially the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2009) 33 (1): 138–143.
Published: 01 January 2009
...-school educational reform and the making of good citizens, the ballad genre—unlike its lyric kin—lacked the glamour needed by poststructuralists seeking to invest literary study of the lyric subject with the cultural importance of medicine or psychiatry. The fall of the popular ballad from...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2001) 25 (1): 126–130.
Published: 01 January 2001
... Jacobitism, towards In- dustrialism (Manchester & N.Y.: Univ. of Manchester/Palgrave, 2000). Pp. xiii + 354. $79.95. ISBN 0-7190-4540-1 Wilson, Renate. Pious Traders in Medicine: A German Pharmaceutical Network in Eigh- teenth-Century North America...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2003) 27 (1): 107–129.
Published: 01 January 2003
... by the sea, were found in this country, yt might be of use in medicine.19 Accordingly, Scotia Illustrata provides a comparative table, “in qua, e regione Exoticorum, ex Indigenis ponuntur quae consimiles vires habent” [where alongside things from...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2017) 41 (2): 3–8.
Published: 01 April 2017
... over 110 papers from scholars working within (and across) the disciplines of architectural history, art history, economic history, garden history, the history of science and medicine, intellectual history, literary studies, philosophy, politics, and reli- gion. A separate edited volume under way...