1-20 of 98 Search Results for

manuscript circulation

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 28–46.
Published: 01 April 2014
... – ​1756), the Anglo-­Saxon scholar whom Ballard befriended and who provided the inspiration for his efforts.8 It is a col- lection about collections, collecting, textuality, scholarship, memorializa- tion, manuscript circulation, collaboration, and the creation of textual lives. In Ballard’s letters...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (1): 50–75.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Rachel Mann Through the figures of Jane Barker, a gentlewoman who lived from 1652 to 1732, and whose work was both circulated in manuscripts as well as print, and Robert Hooke, curator to the Royal Society, this essay shows that experimental science and manuscript culture were premised...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 121–126.
Published: 01 January 2021
... circulation of manuscript and print texts, and that they published an extraordinary diversity of important and original ideas at the dawn of the first information age. Not only women s networking, which included writing within tight social circles, but also their reading, copying, collecting, conversing, writ...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 183–216.
Published: 01 January 2024
... Peters archive studies manuscript circulation print and periodical culture textual recovery 35. Joseph Rezek, “The Print Atlantic: Phillis Wheatley, Ignatius Sancho, and the Cultural Significance of the Book,” Early African American Print Culture , ed. Cohen and Stein, 19 – 39, especially 22...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 113–133.
Published: 01 January 2024
... relevant to the monastic context. Although the practice of circulating work in manuscript might strike contemporaries as anachronistic, it allowed some authors—notably women—to make a space for themselves adjacent to the literary marketplace from which they were often excluded. 19 Work on the literary...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 7–31.
Published: 01 January 2017
... in studies of the textual transmission, reception, and critical conception of Shakespeare.5 Whilst, for example, Arthur F. Marotti and Laura Estill have surveyed the circulation of Shakespearean fragments in Renaissance manuscript miscellanies, there has been no sustained study of the printed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 262–267.
Published: 01 January 2024
... resembled “books,” to play a part in its history other than as a preliminary stage of the print process. Speaking only for myself, even though I worked with both circulated sheets and curated manuscript volumes from the late seventeenth century into the first decades of the eighteenth, I was cautious about...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 76–95.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., although her boast of impartiality is tinged with the irony for which she was known. Lady Mary was an experienced essayist, having written anonymously for The Spectator and for her own short-lived periodical, the Nonsense of Common-Sense. She had circulated her poetry in manuscript since she...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 50–71.
Published: 01 January 2024
... somewhere between. 9 While the reasons for anonymity cannot be assumed to be identical for printed and privately circulated scribal poems, both print and manuscript miscellany compilers clearly subordinated authorial identification to other concerns. As Abigail Williams describes “the popular...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (2): 105–110.
Published: 01 April 2015
... the manuscript versions of prose sagas and verse romances come first in time with oral variants appearing subsequently, or did the manuscript texts reflect material already circulating orally? Henigan envisages an intertwining of the literate strand, represented by the monastic schools, with elite oral...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 28–49.
Published: 01 January 2024
... of the memoirs, but also every place where he had lived. The information on the title-page of Cannon's manuscript, because he did not have it printed, was not designed to circulate in broad social networks, like printed works. Instead, the inclusion of a title-page with all its associated information works...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 65–82.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Hall, Oxford England’s first female professional writer, Aphra Behn (1640 – 89), pre sents problems for those seeking to establish her biography. Despite her contem- porary success and popularity, there is, in Behn’s case, very little to go on. Behn’s manuscript hand survives in only a small...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (2): 100–105.
Published: 01 April 2024
... of performance becomes a counterintuitive opportunity for the playwright. Keeping one's dramatic work out of print, and only circulated on the stage, allowed the playwrights to lay sole claim to ideas or creations that existed only in the moment of performance, or to the complete manuscripts that they hid...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 159–182.
Published: 01 January 2024
...Leith Davis This chapter presents a book‐history analysis of a 2,148‐page manuscript book known as “The Lyon in Mourning.” Compiled after the defeat of the Jacobites at the Battle of Culloden (1746), the work consists of pro‐Jacobite materials copied out by Episcopalian minister Robert Forbes...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2024
...); and Women's Writing and the Circulation of Ideas: Manuscript Publication in England, 1550 – 1800 , ed. George L. Justice and Nathan Tinker (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ., 2002). 3. Elizabeth L. Eisenstein, in “An Unacknowledged Revolution Revisited,” American Historical Review 107 (2002): 87 – 105...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 236–261.
Published: 01 January 2024
... manuscript and print. Correspondents often discussed their own conditions of and expectations for writing, circulating, and storing letters. Shackleton acknowledged how letters were often shared, asking that those who read his correspondence use discretion and promising to do the same. For example...
FIGURES | View All (7)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 6–27.
Published: 01 January 2024
...Bénédicte Miyamoto; Faith D. Acker John Martin wrote “Several Receipts for the Use of Mankind” (1690–96) mainly by copying out printed texts at a time when he was successfully converting from plasterer to the more upwardly mobile profession of painter. In his manuscript, a near‐complete fair copy...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
..., manuscripts were circulated not only by the nobility and gentry, but among writers of quite modest backgrounds. Among the most valuable information contained in Ezell’s book is its identification of a number of poets—Marie Burghope, John Chatwin, Patrick Cary, Mary...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 134–158.
Published: 01 January 2024
..., we do know that British penmanship books circulated in the colonies from manuscript copies executed at the Boston South Writing School and examples from the library of Thomas Walcutt (1758 – 1840), a missionary to indigenous peoples in Canada and a founding member of the Massachusetts Historical...
FIGURES | View All (16)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 111–135.
Published: 01 April 2020
... in 1757 to publish books, poems, tracts, and small detached pieces, from two odes by Thomas Gray to Lucan s Phar- salia, from title- pages to trade cards and labels for restricted circulation within an inner circle of Walpole s friends and acquaintances.4 Such occa- sional publications were arranged...