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luxury

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 68–88.
Published: 01 September 2016
... Davenant, Nicholas Barbon, and Sir Dudley North argued for free trade and the relaxation of government tariffs, particularly as exercised against luxuries imported by the East India Company. Whig economic writers such as John Locke, John Pollexfen, Sir Francis Brewster, and John Cary continued...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 15–37.
Published: 01 April 2018
..., although by no means exclusively female. The family trade is set in the context of women’s involvement in the luxury trades of eighteenth-century London, as both owners and employees. Copyright © 2018 by Duke University Press 2018 women work fans London trade...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (2): 1–44.
Published: 01 April 2009
... endeavor to proceed as if dogs can be considered on the same terms as other kinds of taxable luxuries (devouring resources that might better be devoted to humans), opponents of the tax focus on the bonds of mutual dependency and reciprocal obligation that tie humans and animals together, arguing...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (2): 23–64.
Published: 01 April 2010
..., I shall relate my discussion of the illustrations to changes in technology, the reading revolution, and the skillful marketing strategies of both cheaply produced and luxurious editions of The Seasons in the late eighteenth century. By contextualizing the production within a new midcentury book...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 32–46.
Published: 01 April 2001
..., Hume’s norm is, to use a term that he sought to rescue from opprobrium, the world of material “luxury.”6 The medieval church, with its tithes and Peter’s Pence and po- litical entanglements, depleted capital and fomented civil dissensions, and thus hindered...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (1): 17–28.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., effeminacy, and luxury, the concept of civic humanism or civic virtue has been prominent, if not hegemonic. In that discussion, John Barrell has succinctly remarked that “the discourse of civic humanism was the most authoritative fantasy of masculinity in early...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 21–68.
Published: 01 January 2004
....19 The fashionable urban setting and the fine clothes imply that this sort of dental treatment is a desirable luxury, like the oval, gilt-framed landscape over the sofa, the canary in the ornate cage surveying the procedure, the colorful patterned carpet covering the floor, or the musical...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (1): 107–129.
Published: 01 January 2003
...” (written not in Scots but in neo-classical English, as are about half of Fergusson’s surviving poems). Here the journeying is done for trade, to carry luxury goods “from China’s coast to Britain’s colder clime” (p. 175). Even those Scots who were more-or-less...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 51–68.
Published: 01 September 2021
... to an affordable luxury reaching a wider range of consumers. By the end of the seventeenth century, sugar had become an article of mass consumption in England, used on a daily basis by a quarter of the population. 4 Consumption in France also grew throughout this same period, mainly in urban centers, although...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 44–75.
Published: 01 September 2005
..., and luxury craft products were their most prestigious collectors’ objects, in both the mate- rial and the ideal sense. By looking at art works, the curieux acquired his most important attributes: “goût” and “choix”, that is, taste and discrimina- tion in selecting the objects that deserved...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., as he had famously claimed in The Fable of the Bees (1723), could produce public benefits. A woman’s desires (for both sex and con- sumer goods) spurred and justified “mercantile expansion.” Yet, in a well- rehearsed argument of eighteenth-century writing on women and luxury, Mandeville also...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 56–75.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., but by presenting it as just a customary cultural practice, for which parallels might be found elsewhere. Lien Chi uses “woman” as an index of cultural comparison for his own purposes, here, presenting himself as a rational and refi ned observer at the primary expense of female consumers of luxury goods...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 32–58.
Published: 01 January 2016
... the victor brazenly out- plays her unsuspecting opponent. The historical truth of the story is com- pletely irrelevant to the beauty with which it focused all of the complexi- ties of the luxury debate—political, sexual, economic—into an ingenious victory for an exotic queen and a cautionary tale...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 63–75.
Published: 01 September 2010
...- tic” trade in luxury woods and other goods was never acknowledged in culture, Sets, Lives, and Videotape    6 5 whereas the commerce with the East generated enormous discursive energy. There follows a discussion of lacquer as a cultural commodity...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (2): 29–55.
Published: 01 April 2007
... depicted Indian textiles as a national threat to English trade and gender roles. Like imported china, tea, and lacquered cabinets, calicoes contributed to the debates over luxury in the late seven- teenth and early eighteenth centuries that focused attention on the behavior of female consumers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 1–15.
Published: 01 September 2021
... of the proliferation of soft, luxury furnishings in the elite home was a tendency to invest female bodies with qualities associated with highly sexualized locations. 15 However, through letter-writing in parlors, closets, and other rooms, domestic space facilitated female intellectual activity and scholarly...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 214–224.
Published: 01 April 2001
... to see men clothed like Courtiers.”10 Yet commercial success in an imperial economy bred carnal idolatry and worldly yearnings. New England’s protestant work ethic did not call up the spirit of capitalism so much as its body. The commoner luxuries circulating...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 97–105.
Published: 01 January 2009
... virtuously on local produce. With similar laments for the pastoral age of “Industry and 102 Eighteenth-Century Life Simplicity of Manners,” this would make a marvelous frame for Goldsmith’s Deserted Village, the locus classicus for the urban harlot as emblem of mod- ern luxury and moral decay...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 105–113.
Published: 01 September 2010
... and psychology. Thus, Christopher Berry traces the stoic and patrician sources for Hume’s moderate claim that luxury can, under restrained circumstances, curtail poverty. Similarly, Richard Boyd argues that for Hume, civility provides both a means for people to engage with each other socially...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (3): 165–191.
Published: 01 September 2020
... by explor- ing the spiritual and material for two devout female Anglicans: Katherine Plymley (1758 1829) and Anna Larpent (1758 1832). It charts their ambiva- lence about luxury and their performance of studied restraint, and investi- gates their management of religious morality and social status...