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joy

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (2): 126–139.
Published: 01 April 2013
... Univ. , 2010 ). Pp. xii + 291. 9 ills . $65 Copyright 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 Review Essay Figures of  Impropriety and the Joys of Female Community Toni Bowers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (1): 41–65.
Published: 01 January 2015
...Helen Burke This essay analyzes the Irish jokes that circulated in London in the 1680s, paying particular attention to those that emanated from the stage and from the two earliest Irish joke books, Bog Witticisms; or, Dear Joy’s Common-Places (1682) and Teagueland Jests, or Bogg-Witticisms (1690...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (1): 29–55.
Published: 01 January 2010
... of January from the calendar than to continue thus. Let the mourning and rage end; let “joy and gladness” return. Such an attitude increased in spite of regular denigration. The High Church itself began to be vilified as the true traitor, as in the Atterbury treason trial of 1723; the Hanoverians...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (1): 114–124.
Published: 01 January 2010
... 1-4039-4626-4 Christopher C. Nagle. Sexuality and the Culture of Sensibility in the British Romantic Era (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Pp. 227. $74.95. ISBN 1-4039-8435-2 Adam Potkay. The Story of Joy: From the Bible to Late Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ., 2007). Pp. 304...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 116–119.
Published: 01 January 2009
... Thelwall would surely have enjoyed cannibalizing, if only for the joy of undermining Dryden’s imperialism. Whatever the nature of Thelwall’s sources, these two short plays are polit- ically dynamic and truly comical, enough matter in and of themselves to war- rant further study. The settings are...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 39–61.
Published: 01 January 2007
... and Emperors, clear Heads and hale Hearts? Inform me, what was that which like a chrystal expanded Lake drew all Mankind to bathe entranc’d in Joys, too mighty every one for our poor Utterance? Not the Flavour of forbidden Fruit: Every Dab- bler knows by his Classics, that it was pursu’d and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (3): 23–40.
Published: 01 September 2019
... remains, either from the Doctor or his Biographer. The beginning of the new century to them was the closing of hope, not the opening of joy! and the pocket- book memorandums of both are sterile and blank. 4 Burney expressed her grief later and elsewhere, par- ticularly in her little- known commonplace...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 January 2016
... his involvement with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, is my major concern in this essay. Early Rapture “Rapture” in the literal sense is the state of being carried away by a pow- erful emotion, such as joy, love, or pleasure, and is a synonym for ecstasy. “Rapture” is mental transport, abandon...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (2): 80–110.
Published: 01 April 2012
... Hilderbrandt and Oliver Beckerlegge explain of Methodist hymnbooks, “These volumes were read to destruction, and memorized. In relating their spiritual experiences, their trials and tribulations, their victories and joys, Methodists would as readily quote [Charles] Wesley’s hymns as they would quote...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 168–187.
Published: 01 January 2011
... literally, and about flight imaginatively. Readers were invited aloft to share fears, joys, vicissitudes, and triumphs that draw on epistolary articulations of humanity as much as on science. Letters dissolve distance by bringing writer and reader into a shared communicative space, the written page...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (1): 126–130.
Published: 01 January 2001
...: A Brief History with Documents (Boston & N.Y.: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2001). Pp. xiii + 237. $45. ISBN 0-312-23701-4 ECL25108-126-Book.p65 127 4/16/01, 10:21 AM 128 James, Francis G., and Miriam G. Hill, eds. Joy to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2019) 43 (3): 143–147.
Published: 01 September 2019
... poet writes his happy songs / Every child may joy to hear (my italics). Particularly in The Songs of Experience (1794), however, Blake was also aware of the opposite func- tion of writing as a form of discipline designed to repress nature. The inscrip- tion Thou shalt not, writ over the door in...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 6–11.
Published: 01 September 2010
... joy” on first reading the works of Ossian at the age of sixteen. In her voluminous correspondence, Seward would chide friends who did not share her admiration, nor, as Jack Lynch notes in his excellent new study, did any apparent reservations about the authenticity of the Ossianic poems dampen...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (2): 106–113.
Published: 01 April 2010
... work of his pupils in Liverpool, notably Richard Hurleston (active 1763  –  77) and William Tate (1748  –  1806). In descriptive prose that is a joy to read, she hones in on Wright’s innovations, such as capturing the effects of fire, lamp, and candlelight, or building up layers of warmer, but...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (3): 101–105.
Published: 01 September 2012
... (that is, pleasure and joy) as a nat- ural truth of the body that could anchor a secular morality without any refer- ence to transcendental notions of sin or divine grace. Far from being a blinding and oppressive force, as it had been in the Cartesian tradition, passion was now a desirable source...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 47–74.
Published: 01 April 2014
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 January 2016
..., and a chearful Wit, That all-subduing, that enliv’ning Air By which, a sympathizing Joy we share, For who forbears to smile, when smil’d on by the Fair? (39–51) Finch’s veneration of the “sympathizing Joy” shared between poet and sub- ject celebrates an affective bond between the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 32–46.
Published: 01 April 2001
... leveling threat represented by parliamentary dissenters. Hume’s contempt for Puritan “enthusiasts” can have a Swiftian edge: “Some men of the greatest parts and most ex- tensive knowledge, that the nation, at this time, produced, could not en- joy any peace of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 22–38.
Published: 01 January 2007
... “like a chrystal expanded Lake drew all Mankind to bathe entranc’d in Joys, too mighty every one for our poor Utterance.” Now, thanks to Christianity, that “celebrated Passion” has been so “exploded” and “disown’d” that we can study it with the utmost thor- oughness, “free from Apprehension of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (1): 119–135.
Published: 01 January 2002
... Sporting with Clothes 121 mount; and the subtitle of a painting similar to this—The Joys of the Chase, or The Rising Woman and Falling Man, which was exhibited at the Free Society in 1780— also indicates a spirit of competition between the sexes.3 In both works...