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feminist literary history

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (3): 1–28.
Published: 01 September 2013
... little read—and too-often misunderstood—late writings. This essay concludes that the Memoirs ought to be revalued for its importance to literary history and feminist aging studies, at the same time providing a new line of inquiry to help us make sense of its supposed failure. Copyright 2013 by Duke...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (1): 79–108.
Published: 01 January 2022
... projects of historicizing the associations between women writers and theorizing the gender of aesthetic production. Copyright 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 eighteenth-century women poets Genesis revision feminist literary history second-wave feminism feminist literary criticism...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 81–87.
Published: 01 September 2010
... of writing as truly political. Feminist scholars from a variety of disciplines, including history, litera- ture, and political theory, have begun to challenge this phallocentrism. Femi- nist political theorists, for their part, have shown how gender undergirds some of the central concepts...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 19–27.
Published: 01 January 2009
...Claudia Thomas Kairoff Susan Staves. A Literary History of Women's Writing in Britain, 1660-1789 . (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ, 2006). Pp. 536. $150. ISBN 0-521-85865-8 Duke University Press 2008 Review Essay A Canon of Our Own...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (3): 73–102.
Published: 01 September 2000
... profession in terms of our ability to deal honestly with texts and to nur- ture a knowledgeable and careful younger generation of scholars who can in their turn pass on literary history. Literary history through the recent lens of Gender Studies becomes a strange mishmash indeed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2018
... that could also be found in the personal statements of the runaway women whose “human nature” and lived experiences Behn was 8 Eighteenth-Century Life co-opting and reanimating for, as I will argue, implicitly feminist purposes. In performing close readings of these literary reanimations...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2003
.... Governing Female Novel-Reading 21 10. Revolution and the Word: The Rise of the Novel in America (Oxford: Oxford Univ., 1986), 42. Ina Ferris, in The Achievement of Literary Authority: Gender, History, and the Waverley Novels (Ithaca: Cornell Univ., 1991), highlights a similar critical...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 51–71.
Published: 01 January 2013
... powerful individuals. A tradition of writing by and for women was available, and it was aristocratic in origin. The seventeenth-­century romance, as feminist critics have long argued, provided a literary resource women could use to advance claims for respect or equality. “In France,” asserts...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 74–82.
Published: 01 January 2009
... that responded to shifts in narrative style and structure afoot in the Augustan literary arena” (9). The new critical story accounts for changes in Haywood’s style by emphasizing her innovation and involvement in the novel’s early history as one of the first novelists. Many of the new stories being...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 89–102.
Published: 01 September 2016
... common. It has been given an impetus from feminist scholarship on coteries—­ British Literary Salons is an instance of this—and from materialist histories Eighteenth-Century Life Volume 40, Number 3, September 2016  doi 10.1215/00982601-3629372...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 149–154.
Published: 01 January 2012
... pressure not to let her literary history get ahead of itself conceptually. Both books move ahead through close readings of the Jacobin canon: Revolu- tionary Subjects proceeds through chapters on Godwin’s Caleb Williams (1794) and Fenwick’s Secresy (1795), Wollstonecraft’s Maria (1798) and Mary Hays’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (2): 106–111.
Published: 01 April 2024
... easily to key works of the period, like Arnold's Culture and Anarchy , and more broadly to emerging ideas about “literature” as a collection of inherently valuable national gospels, ensured its relevancy. Scholars connected the history of pornography to the rise of the novel and a changing literary...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 145–149.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of feminist criticism, literary icons were investigated for the ways in which they promoted misogyny in powerfully influential texts. What, though, is the payoff in dig- ging out Dryden’s The Kind Keeper, for instance, and exposing its misogyny when the play has probably not been produced in centuries...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (2): 48–73.
Published: 01 April 2006
... of imagination and wonder in children’s books.2 This “Whiggish view of children’s literary history” has been called into question by recent scholarship; perhaps even more importantly, the history of children’s literature, once a sort of “hobby” fi eld, has come into the mainstream of cultural and literary...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 110–114.
Published: 01 September 2007
... – 58, reprinted from MacKinnon, Toward a Feminist Theory of State (Cambridge: Harvard Univ., 1989). 4. Marsden is author of The Re-Imagined Text: Shakespeare, Adaptation, and Eighteenth-Century Literary Theory (Lexington: Univ. of Kentucky, 1995), and editor of The Appropriation...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
... the women writers who were crossed off the disciplinary rolls of literary history when professions, including authorship, became an officially male domain. Throughout this wide-ranging study of the technology of writing and its effects, Siskin’s attention to the hard...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 17–22.
Published: 01 September 2010
... that most literary critics and feminists dismiss the Enlightenment as an overly rational, elitist, and misogynistic movement or set of ideas, but perhaps this is because they have adopted an outdated Whiggish view. Moreover, there are many historians who still credit the Enlightenment with spurring...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 September 2010
... of the female novelists from literary history, which had fash- ioned from the mid and later eighteenth century onwards a canon of five male novelists, who were seen as the founders and forefathers of the genre: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, and Sterne. Among the host of women novel- ists through...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 January 2016
... Rich’s “feminist historiography” through her ekphrasis in “Mathilde in Normandy.” As Loizeaux explains, By constantly reminding us of the crafted artifact, Rich raises to con­ sciousness the fact that history is made rather than simply reported, and that it is made, here, by women...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (1): 90–95.
Published: 01 January 2008
...-right” (91) and its claim “that the literary sphere effaces women’s political difference” (115). Once one has sorted all this out, one questions the book’s central equation of sexual politics and “contractarian” political theory. For example, given the complex history of the term Whig...