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feminist literary criticism

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (1): 79–108.
Published: 01 January 2022
... projects of historicizing the associations between women writers and theorizing the gender of aesthetic production. Copyright 2022 by Duke University Press 2022 eighteenth-century women poets Genesis revision feminist literary history second-wave feminism feminist literary criticism...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (3): 73–102.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- versity Press, 1998. Pp. 230. $59.95. ISBN 0-521-63063-0 Ellen Gardiner. Regulating Readers: Gender and Literary Criticism in the Eigh- teenth-Century Novel. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1999. Pp. 198. $36.50. ISBN 0-874136954 Jacqueline Pearson...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 19–27.
Published: 01 January 2009
... traditions or aesthetic criteria. As Staves indicates in her introduc- tory chapter, feminist critics have been reluctant to exclude some women writ- ers from serious discussion, especially writers who had disappeared for close to three hundred years before recent efforts unearthed them. Many scholars...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2003
... a new literary critical paradigm for valuing literature. The question for the novel at the turn of the century was not “Are novels immoral?” but “Which novels are immoral and most important, “Who will have the authority to decide?” The answer to “Who” varied among critics, but all agreed that 4...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 74–82.
Published: 01 January 2009
... that responded to shifts in narrative style and structure afoot in the Augustan literary arena” (9). The new critical story accounts for changes in Haywood’s style by emphasizing her innovation and involvement in the novel’s early history as one of the first novelists. Many of the new stories being...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2018
.... In paying closer heed to Behn’s repeated deployment of the runaway-woman motif, I argue, we are able to see her relationship to what we now call “feminism” in a new light. For while some critics have acknowledged a longer tradition of feminist thought than that which originated in the post...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 149–154.
Published: 01 January 2012
.... While she belabors the point, to the certain benefit of students unfamiliar with the subject, the larger reason for doing so is her desire to dissolve, then recon- stitute, the critical categories that had begun to crystallize within the much neglected field of the English Romantic novel...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 145–149.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of feminist criticism, literary icons were investigated for the ways in which they promoted misogyny in powerfully influential texts. What, though, is the payoff in dig- ging out Dryden’s The Kind Keeper, for instance, and exposing its misogyny when the play has probably not been produced in centuries...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (1): 51–71.
Published: 01 January 2013
... powerful individuals. A tradition of writing by and for women was available, and it was aristocratic in origin. The seventeenth-­century romance, as feminist critics have long argued, provided a literary resource women could use to advance claims for respect or equality. “In France,” asserts...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 89–102.
Published: 01 September 2016
... common. It has been given an impetus from feminist scholarship on coteries—­ British Literary Salons is an instance of this—and from materialist histories Eighteenth-Century Life Volume 40, Number 3, September 2016  doi 10.1215/00982601-3629372...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 January 2016
.... By the eighteenth- century, ut pictura poesis had become an influential guiding principle for many writers. See David Marshall, “Literature and Other Arts,” in vol. 4 of The Cambridge History 104   Eighteenth-Century Life of Literary Criticism, ed. H. B. Nisbet and Claude Rawson (New York: Cambridge Univ...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 1–5.
Published: 01 September 2010
... — and stories of love and honour so maudlin in conception and driveling in execution, that it is surprising they could ever have been tolerated even by the most defective moral sense or taste” (66). Minus Victorian moral superiority and priggishness, early twentieth- ­­century critics and literary...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 73–88.
Published: 01 April 2017
... nineteenth-century domesticity. I wish to reexamine this question and argue for Female Biography being continuous with feminist thought by reading it as a critical response to Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Emile (1763). Rousseau's restrictive ideal of female education was widely repudiated by 1790s feminist...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 17–22.
Published: 01 September 2010
... that most literary critics and feminists dismiss the Enlightenment as an overly rational, elitist, and misogynistic movement or set of ideas, but perhaps this is because they have adopted an outdated Whiggish view. Moreover, there are many historians who still credit the Enlightenment with spurring...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 110–114.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., “Criticism and the Subject of Sexual Violence,” Modern Language Notes 98 (1983): 1269 – 78, and Catharine A. MacKinnon, “Rape: On Coercion and Consent,” Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory, ed. Katie Conboy, Nadia Medina, and Sarah Stanbury (New York: Columbia Univ., 1997), 41...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
... to printers’ workshops and booksellers. Yet a new stream of studies is critically re-evaluating Eisenstein’s classic work across a number of fronts. Adrian Johns and Margaret J. M. Ezell take issue quite openly with some of the dominant assumptions over the last twenty...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 120–124.
Published: 01 January 2009
... in the official “patri- archive,” whether that be composed of company papers or of other materials favored by historians of the state and its agencies. If, as Joseph makes clear, the archive is “a Tool for Male Legal Subjectivity and the Preservation of Property” (7), then feminist critics are forced...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (1): 90–95.
Published: 01 January 2008
... was an anathema to emergent construc- tions of femininity and female authorship in this period” (25). In “Anna Seward: Swan, Duckling, or Goose?” Norma Clarke uses Seward to illustrate a shift to which contemporary scholarship has paid little attention: as critical journals staffed by men grew more...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (1): 81–87.
Published: 01 January 2023
..., family, and critics influenced the author's recycling of material from her earlier works, such as in her juvenilia, for example, Evelina (which Havens calls “internal revision”), and even in her writing style (which we might call “external revision”). Like Richardson's alterations to Lovelace, Burney's...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (2): 48–73.
Published: 01 April 2006
...’ story, old wives’ fable ), an unlikely story; a widely held or traditional belief now thought to be incorrect or erroneous. Cf. earlier old woman’s tale s.v. OLD WOMAN n. 1b. — Oxford English Dictionary Online, New Edition (2004) English Romantic poets’ (and Victorian critics’) distaste...