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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 78–106.
Published: 01 September 2006
...Barbara M. Benedict Duke University Press 2006 Displaying Diff erence: Curious Count Boruwlaski and the Staging of Class Identity Barbara M. Benedict Trinity College...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (2): 3–24.
Published: 01 April 2005
... win recognition. All three, then, had to establish their own authority to speak out and also to fi nd ways of holding the attention of potential readers.2 To notice the relative equality of the abilities of Graunt, Petty, and Swift allows a new and diff erent appreciation of the parodic...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2007
... pole from the formal verse satires that engaged his attention four decades ago. Interestingly, this idea of satire also has its roots in the classical past, but in a classical past so diff erent from that of Horace and Juvenal that it would be barely recognizable to those who thought they knew...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2006
... historians create “diff erent versions of their shared past which accorded with their contemporary political needs,” a tradition that on the Scottish side involves attempts to combat Anglo-Saxon hege- mony at the expense of putative Scoto-Hibernian relations (19). For Scot- tish historians of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (2): 47–90.
Published: 01 April 2005
...-century En- gland at times makes it diffi cult to decide where one person’s parts end and another’s begin. The wig’s physical nature — the way it shuttles among diff erent individuals, recomposing the body and its surfaces — erodes the boundaries that set the individual subject off from the world...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 56–75.
Published: 01 January 2006
... to facilitate the survey of diff erent peoples, and to off er, as the subtitle to his 1764 poem “The Traveller” puts it, “a Prospect of Society.”7 Like the imaginary traveler in the fi rst number of Goldsmith’s periodical The Bee (1759), for example, Lien Chi considers himself a “philosophic...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 76–91.
Published: 01 January 2006
... study of any “other.” He writes in his conclusion, My hypothesis is that Jews, women, and other “others” have all had the potential to turn the tables on their describers in one way or another, that they have all been equally clever in this respect, but that diff ering...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (1): 50–81.
Published: 01 January 2005
..., biweekly, triweekly, and weekly press — a coverage in newspapers and magazines that paved the way for later reactions to the French Revolution and that was remarkable for its tremendous variety. Depending on which publication readers perused, the storming of the Bastille looked completely diff...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 January 2007
..., there were three diff erent editions of the correspondence that Pope himself had indirectly or directly engi- neered for publication: “Curll’s” in 1735, the authorized 1737 folio and quarto versions, and the 1737 Roberts octavo. The 1737 folio and quarto versions reduced the total number of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 60–75.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., for instance, gives Robinson Crusoe (1719) many of the formal accou- trements of truth, claiming, through an editor, that his novel is a “just His- tory of Fact,” without even the “Appearance of Fiction in it.”6 Actual trav- elers obsessed over this diff erence, often accusing one another of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 107–134.
Published: 01 September 2006
.... Carthagena is 110 Eighteenth-Century Life infested with numerous fl ocks of bats, which annoy not only the cattle but the inhabitants. In the islands, legions of ants have, at diff erent times, consumed every vegetable production, and left the earth entirely bare, as if it had been...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 88–96.
Published: 01 January 2007
... many diff erent fi elds, it was thought only a team could cover them all. That may well be true, but the proj- ect failed. That contract for a life has now been given to James Harris, a philos- opher at St. Andrews University. The other recent biography is that of Roderick Graham, which, alas...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (1): 1–22.
Published: 01 January 2005
... should watch thy Infant Steps, and lead thee into Life. May thy Fate yet be better than that of her who bore thee” (2:263). Well after the boy is admitted to the Hospital, Miss Standish is briefl y reunited with her lover, although the parents’ reunion makes no diff erence to the “Fate” of the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (2): 32–47.
Published: 01 April 2006
...” profoundly aff ected political consciousness and prompted observers to interpret some male suicides in political terms. I begin with a female suicide that was interpreted in a diff erent way, but not in order to make a quantitative argument about diff erences between the sexes, which I have addressed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 44–75.
Published: 01 September 2005
... understand the phenomenon of curi- osité, with its entire spectrum of objects and its social practices, as a histor- ical unit whose specifi c nature diff ers from the Kunst- und Wunderkam- mern. In this essay the Parisian collections curieuses will be anchored within a framework that, inspired by Pierre...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 22–38.
Published: 01 January 2007
... printer, John Purser, consisting primarily of excerpts from the text itself, is reproduced in its entirety on pages 39 to 61. The others, recording the diff erent phases of the legal proceedings in which Purser and Cannon were caught up, make it possible to reconstruct in some detail the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 97–99.
Published: 01 January 2007
... clubs as venues for projection of an aestheticized nationality (nationalism without party or political program) fails to convince. The con- nections between the three cases are not clear-cut despite the fact that circum- stances and approaches to imagining a Scottish nation diff er greatly from club...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 25–55.
Published: 01 January 2006
... diff erent strands of patronage were also interwoven in women’s lives in sometimes unexpected ways, for a variety of confl icting motives. The Bluestocking sisters, Sarah Scott and Elizabeth Montagu, who have not been considered from this point of view either in the literature on patronage and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 76–96.
Published: 01 September 2005
... the texts presented, . . . second, to stress the texts’ diff erent, indigenous, ‘Gothic’ nature.”3 The implied dispute between Groom and Baatz concerns only the extent to which the gothic exists and how it is used in the title page, the facing fron- tispiece, and in the typography of the text...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (1): 62–80.
Published: 01 January 2007
... narrative reemerges within the actions of his libertine crew, in the form of their egalitarian circular contract. In this period it was usual for crews in the Pacifi c to overwinter in the Sandwich Isles. That Meares places a diff er- ent interpretation on the mutineers’ intention to go there, in order...