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coterie

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 28–49.
Published: 01 January 2024
... fidelity and credibility. Our case study also pushes us to reconsider some of the clustered assumptions around the nature of the manuscript book in this period: this is the work of a male, non‐elite writer, an amateur production. It is not a family or coterie production, and rather than offering...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 121–126.
Published: 01 January 2021
...Susan Carlile Schellenberg Betty . Literary Coteries and the Making of Modern Print Culture: 1740–1790 ( Cambridge : Cambridge Univ. , 2016 ). Pp. 320. $99.99 Copyright © 2021 by Duke University Press 2021 R e v i e w E s s a y Eighteenth- Century Life Volume 45, Number 1...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (1): 35–62.
Published: 01 January 2023
... labor and, by extension, the reading public who bought her work. In contrast, the literary coteries that developed in the 1740s and 1750s often comprised both upper- and middle-class members, male and female, whose allegiance was primarily internal. According to Schellenberg, a coterie “used scribal...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 109–114.
Published: 01 April 2014
...- nets, and one each about her critical remarks on Erasmus Darwin and Samuel Johnson. Kairoff argues that Seward deserves to be read as her own person and on her own terms — ​not as the coterie poet known to her contemporaries, or as the Sapphic writer as she has recently been represented...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 89–102.
Published: 01 September 2016
... to solitude, but to a coterie.” —Lord Dudley to Mary Berry, 10 May 18241 Literary historians have devoted considerable effort to the study of individu- als and of groups, but not so much to groups of individuals. This likely reflects the dominance of the novel as a narrative form: the developmental...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 January 2024
..., and ordering text in the age of commodified print. And perhaps more surprisingly, despite long-standing assumptions about manuscript book-making as a practice of elite coteries or an outgrowth of privileged educational networks, in the eighteenth century many of these books were produced by obscure...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 113–117.
Published: 01 January 2012
... of a broader cultural politics” (13). Instead, the female coterie forms one half of the dialectic against which literature defined itself (230). A historian, Russell has composed a well-­illustrated study rich in primary texts, both obscure and canonical. She is in dialogue with overlapping work...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 25–55.
Published: 01 January 2006
... coteries and circles” and that “these coterie-based groups were infl uential for the career of a woman writer” (30). This was as true for Sarah Scott, as for Mary Astell, Ann Finch, Penelope Aubin, Eliza Haywood, Mary Davys, Jane Barker, and the other women writing before 1740 whom Prescott studies...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 1–11.
Published: 01 April 2018
...- Introduction 5 nal dynamics and coteries. Consequently, they view Burney productions as texts stimulated by and produced from within a network of intellectual, professional, and social relationships. To researchers working on Frances Burney, we issue a fresh challenge to consider her...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 113–133.
Published: 01 January 2024
... coterie has also emphasized manuscript's ability to build and sustain a unique identity for a community, often via a self-conscious withdrawal from the world of print. 20 These studies have a limited application to conventual writing, however, because they often emphasize how manuscript circulation...
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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 76–95.
Published: 01 January 2017
..., and her social standing. She is a transitional figure between manuscript and print, disseminating work in manuscript for much of her life and occasionally dipping into print by accident or design. In her teens, she shared her work with a coterie of other educated girls her age, collecting her...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 67–70.
Published: 01 January 2009
... that allowed control of the local trade. True also of Andrew Carpenter’s essay on literature in print, which carefully delineates Dublin court culture, noting the impact of Kinsale on literary production and coterie self-reference in the small clique of early seventeenth-century writing. The revelation...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (1): 29–42.
Published: 01 January 2001
..., therefore, to a coterie exchanging verses in a provincial context many years prior to their appearance in print. The importance of this network of writers continued throughout Rowe’s career. For example, Watts edited Rowe’s posthumous Divine Meditations of the Heart...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (2): 98–109.
Published: 01 April 2008
... into The Rambler’s “other name” is ultimately about the grammatically self-reflexive act of “doing one’s self the honour” not so much of reading what The Rambler has to say, as of picking up one’s pen and joining the coterie by becoming a regular journal writer or social critic. It comes as little surprise...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 23–27.
Published: 01 September 2010
... the third Earl of Shaftesbury, the Kit-­Cat Club, and Jacob Tonson. This key chapter subtly adjusts our understanding of the Habermasian public sphere: Williams makes a compelling case that Whig writers created a con- sciously modern patronage system—melding coterie, bureaucracy, and civil society...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2023) 47 (1): 135–139.
Published: 01 January 2023
... may be well familiar with the Bluestocking salon and the coterie at Streatham Park, Franklin presents a new account of Piozzi's social participation in salon culture. As “the world came to Streatham,” Piozzi's salon soon rivaled established “gatherings hosted by Frances Boscawen or Elizabeth Vesey...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2024) 48 (1): 262–267.
Published: 01 January 2024
... established the existence of later coteries and the continuing importance of creating, circulating, and preserving manuscript texts for writers and readers. As the contributors to this special issue, “The Manuscript Book in the Long Eighteenth Century,” amply illustrate, in England and in the New World...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
...’ broad study. According to a Whig history of print culture (one rehearsed by some of the books reviewed here), the elitist world of manuscript writing, dominated by coteries of high-ranking gentlemen and genteel women, gave way in the Restoration...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (3): 57–80.
Published: 01 September 2012
... semipublic, conversational, more of a coterie work. The poem takes on an intertextual relationship with the poems printed immediately before and after it. The point is that shifting contexts and contiguities leave significant traces about the text, and that the meanings implied ought...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 41–47.
Published: 01 September 2010
... coterie culture, where “originality” became the mark of marketable dif- ference; between those profiting from this new literary marketplace, through “mechanical” reproduction, and those wishing to protect the cachet of the emerging category of the “literary” by insisting on the distinction...