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convict transportation

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2017) 41 (2): 139–153.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Killian Quigley Irish men and women made up more than a quarter of the approximately one hundred and sixty thousand convicts transported from the British Isles to Australia in the period 1787-1868. They feature, in major accounts of early New South Wales, as irredeemably shiftless, and prone to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2002) 26 (3): 202–224.
Published: 01 September 2002
... the First Fleet, saw only the impossibility of settle- ment.2 And where the first transported convicts saw a living incarcera- tion, their jailers saw opportunities for preferment of various degrees. Clearly, what the naturalist, fleet commander, and penitential officer...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2002) 26 (1): 147–155.
Published: 01 January 2002
... visionary convictions in the accounts of the new British settlement in Australia, Paul Carter quotes Watkin Tench, whose Narrative of the Expedition to Botany Bay (1789) was published only a year after the foundation of the colony. “The scene to an...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2017) 41 (2): 3–8.
Published: 01 April 2017
... rights of access, Killian Quigley takes up the plight of Irish convicts on ships to the early Australian colonies to consider how descriptions of scurvy as a pathology contributed to conceptualizing national differences between transported Europeans. Examining accounts of Irish convicts penned by...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2000) 24 (3): 103–111.
Published: 01 September 2000
...- cal martyrs” were convicted of sedition, and sentenced to transportation for between seven and fourteen years. Barrell shows how the legal tech- nology developed so that they were convicted for planning something “very close to treason”; a few months later, when Robert...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2003) 27 (1): 85–106.
Published: 01 January 2003
... recommended for mercy; Meredith, to transportation; and Smithson, to three years of navigation. These cases reflect the prevalence of a language of mental states in the English courtroom. By the middle of the eighteenth century pre-trial examinations and trial...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2000) 24 (1): 88–102.
Published: 01 January 2000
... State of the Gaols of the Kingdom.” The committee’s wide-ranging mandate stemmed from growing concerns about the thousands of debtors confined in England’s prisons. While few En- glish citizens were offended to learn that the nation’s convicted felons were forced to endure inhumane prison conditions...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2014) 38 (3): 100–110.
Published: 01 September 2014
... notwithstanding their pleas of mercy—“consider our ages, upwards of seventy”—both were transported.3 To potential paper thieves (or any other thief for that matter) the obvi- ous places to target were those trades that dealt with large quantities of paper, namely the printers and booksellers. Searching...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2012) 36 (2): 80–110.
Published: 01 April 2012
... evidence. He records: “A young Woman, till then quite unawakened, was cut to the Heart and sunk to the Ground: Tho’ she could not give a clear, rational Account of the Manner how the Conviction seized upon her.” 2 Writing of another group of followers, he states, “The more I con- verse with this...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2003) 27 (3): 124–139.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Modernity, 1650–1750 (Oxford: Oxford Univ., 2001), 702–03. 7. John Locke, “A Letter Concerning Toleration” (1685), in David Wootton, ed., John Locke: Political Writings (London: Penguin, 1993), 390–436, esp. 426, 431. 8. The Fatal Shore: A History of the Transportation of Convicts to Australia...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2006) 30 (2): 1–31.
Published: 01 April 2006
... prisons must have looked, they often proved highly per- meable, allowing visits by family and friends, and permitting prisoners themselves — debtors and even, on occasion, convicted felons — to leave the jail to shop, beg, or conduct business. Our modern penitentiary sys- tem would have seemed...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2013) 37 (1): 97–118.
Published: 01 January 2013
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2001) 25 (3): 43–61.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Farquhar wrote The Recruiting Officer, professional expertise was much more important than individual heroics. Specialized branches of training such as mining, engineering, munitions and ordnance, transport, etc., were becoming increasingly important. As technology and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2002) 26 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2002
... savage under “a sudden transport of passion” could well “commit the most unnatural and barbarous of all actions, the murder of his own child,” because the children were “under the necessity of submitting to the severe and arbitrary will of their father” (p. 81). In other...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2011) 35 (1): 188–207.
Published: 01 January 2011
... — forbid any Protestant there to transport — his goods into England, with intent to reside — there, uppon pain of confiscat- ing.6 The King leaves Windsor ye 11th of next month & goes to Newmarket ye 16th, where hee tarrys till the meeting of ye parliam t7 — I goe to Cambridge next week8 & intend...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2002) 26 (2): 83–95.
Published: 01 April 2002
... single book is quite literally endless, includ- ing innumerable headings not even mentioned by Johns— rates of literacy, range of distribution, the income, class and gender of buyers, cost of paper, efficiency of transportation, and on and on. Consider Johns’ own book...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2013) 37 (2): 85–103.
Published: 01 April 2013
... wife’s security and position: engag- ing in a frivolous duel, fleeing to France with his mother while Cecilia is evicted from her estate, and then challenging Mr. Belfield to another duel. 98  Eighteenth-Century Life His tendency to become “transported by passion” is a sign of selfishness...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2017) 41 (1): 158–178.
Published: 01 January 2017
... interesting as a reflection of current tendencies, as part of the history of taste. But it is not intrin- sically interesting, and none of the critics, even when praising Cowley’s abilities, does so with very much conviction.”15 Cowley has been seen as a The Digital Miscellanies Index and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2001) 25 (2): 32–46.
Published: 01 April 2001
... faintly arch coyness: He [the king] went down to Chester, to receive him on his first landing from Ireland; flew into his arms with transports of joy; and having ob- tained the formal consent of the barons in parliament to his re-establish...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2000) 24 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 January 2000
... oppressors.27 The bard that faces Edward’s troops is a remnant of the former wealth and cultural prestige of the original Britons—the modern Welsh—and a proud remnant. In Evan Evans’ “Paraphrase of the 137th Psalm” (1764), which transforms Babylonian captivity into the transport of the Welsh bards into...