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clarissa

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (3): 99–123.
Published: 01 September 2003
...Heather Zias The College of William & Mary 2003 Who Can Believe? Sentiment vs. Cynicism in Richardson’s Clarissa Heather Zias West Virginia University You actually accept a law...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 1–28.
Published: 01 September 2007
...Adam Budd Duke University Press 2007 Why Clarissa Must Die: Richardson’s Tragedy and Editorial Heroism Adam Budd University of Edinburgh When Samuel Richardson released the final...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (3): 57–88.
Published: 01 September 2017
... knowledge and, thereby, modern pleasure. I here try to reclaim lost classical allusions, and use lexicography, textual variants, rape and marriage laws, and social and dynastic history to illumine Tom Jones, Pamela in her Exalted Condition , and Clarissa. The historical critic thus is empirical, inductive...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (2): 126–139.
Published: 01 April 2013
... Richardson’s Clarissa (1747  –  ­48) and the turn of the nineteenth century, Bin- hammer pursues that question by examining Richardson’s novel against a mul- titude of later works in four genres. These are: 1. The supposedly true seduction tales proffered in pamphlets written to support...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 51–64.
Published: 01 January 2011
... January 1755), as potential reading material “for young Women, who wish to be tho:t prudent & good,” and as “a Critique on Clarissa & Grandison” (Richardson to Bradshaigh, 2 Janu- ary 1758).4 Richardson described the value of these epistolary materials for their potential publishers as “letters...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (3): 112–122.
Published: 01 September 2012
... and interiority we associ- ate with characters from novels, strict liability turns people into things” (15). Although novels exhibit interiority — ​even Macpherson must admit its exis- tence in a text such as Clarissa  — ​strict liability trumps everything. While critical reading certainly means paying...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2000) 24 (3): 73–102.
Published: 01 September 2000
.... Women’s Reading in Britain:1750–1835. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. Pp. 300. $59.95. ISBN 0-521-58439- 6 Janine Barchas with Gordon D. Fulton. The Annotations in Lady Bradshaigh’s Copy of “Clarissa.” English Literary Studies, University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 29–59.
Published: 01 September 2007
... and reader.”3 As this essay will argue, both Wharton’s novel and Eliot’s poem document Richardson’s enduring value within what has come to be defi ned as the modernist aesthetic through their separate and yet parallel engagement with the “plasticity” of Rich- ardson’s Clarissa. Furthermore, returning...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2011) 35 (1): 9–28.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Richardson’s corre- spondence. As well as creating the numerous fictional letters that make up the nineteen volumes of his three epistolary novels — Pamela (in two parts, 1 7 4 0   –  4 1 ) , Clarissa ( 1 7 4 7    –  4 8 ) , a n d Sir Charles Grandison ( 1 7 5 3   –   5 4 )  —  R i c h - ardson...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (3): 65–104.
Published: 01 September 2009
... University Toward the close of Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa, or The History of a Young Lady (1747 – 48), a novel obsessed with corporeality, we find a sequence of correspondences between Robert Lovelace and John Belford that expresses not only Lovelace’s morbidly obsessive desires...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (2): 105–108.
Published: 01 April 2014
... literary world. 108  Eighteenth-Century Life Among the early readers of Roderick Random was the Earl of Orrery, who on 12 March 1748 wrote breathlessly to Thomas Carew: “Clarissa kept us up till two in the morning. Rhoderic [sic] will keep us up all night, and he, I am told...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2016) 40 (3): 126–129.
Published: 01 September 2016
... in a God whose Providence is no longer discernible in the world. This bears rich fruit in the following chapter on Clarissa (1747–48), a novel that “sharpens the Butlerian argument from desire” (79) and updates Job, along Warburtonian lines, “as a religious fiction for an age coming to grips...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (3): 133–137.
Published: 01 September 2012
...”: in these novels, “Consent hovers in the world or on one’s skin or between bodies or over different slices of time” (193). In the final chapter, Kramnick turns to Clarissa and provides an intelligent account of the conflict between the heroine and her family as one over whether the heroine’s refusal to marry...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 133–147.
Published: 01 January 2021
... on to show how corpuscularity informs gender in her chapter on Clarissa (1748), but here we are tantalized by a series of fascinating provocations. In the next chapter, Thompson paints a picture of Lockean empiricism that is very different from the one most of us are accustomed to: The Locke who emerges...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (3): 106–111.
Published: 01 September 2012
.... The potential for autonomous judgment in Smith may be more endangered than Valihora implies. Chapter 4 argues that Richardson’s Clarissa, anticipat- ing Smith, seeks impartiality independent of the viewpoints of others (184); she searches “for a form of judgment beyond the standards of propriety” (173...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 44–47.
Published: 01 January 2009
... of literary instruction,” Goring insists, pointing to Richardson’s emphasis on the eloquent potential of Clarissa’s ill- ness (staged for spectators) and to Sarah Fielding’s Remarks on Clarissa with its instructions for how to read the novel (175). Goring lets Laurence Sterne have the final word...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 118–124.
Published: 01 September 2014
... 118    1 1 9 smartly annotated in accessible paperback formats (for instance, Angus Ross’s Clarissa and Jocelyn Harris’s Grandison will continue to thrive in the class- room), but a landmark edition of Richardson’s complete works has...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2010) 34 (3): 32–35.
Published: 01 September 2010
... Copyright 2009 by Duke University Press 32     3 3 she pays closest attention to novels: Defoe’s Colonel Jack and Captain Single- ton, Richardson’s Clarissa and Grandison, Burney’s Evelina, and Godwin’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (3): 31–52.
Published: 01 September 2003
... render Clarissa’s Robert Lovelace attractive, he could enter the suffering of the Italian lady, so much so that some wondered about the degree of his sympathy for the Catholic Clementina.52 That he was successful in making her appealing is shown by the response of contemporary readers. Many were...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 97–105.
Published: 01 January 2009
... of pornographia, and provocative new insights into such well-trodden classics as The Fable of the Bees (1714), Roxana (1724), Clarissa (1748), and Tom Jones (1749). I can only sample here the many new angles on old texts that I will pon- der and probably incorporate into my teaching. I like Rosenthal’s...