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clandestine marriages

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2013) 37 (2): 85–103.
Published: 01 April 2013
...Ann Campbell This essay argues that Frances Burney in Cecilia; or Memoirs of an Heiress (1782) critiques political debates and literary conventions focused on clandestine marriage. Through two plots of this novel, one economic and one focused on courtship, Burney interprets clandestine marriage as...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2016) 40 (2): 66–87.
Published: 01 April 2016
... before the Marriage Act of 1753 in England and Wales, especially the notorious clandestine marriage trade of London, I argue that there is a strong suggestion throughout that Sarah may not be simply a discarded mistress, but actually the rake's first wife. By contemplating ways in which the moral lesson...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2011) 35 (2): 39–75.
Published: 01 April 2011
...Helen E. M. Brooks This essay examines the ways marriage could function both to the benefit and detriment of an actress's professional activities and agency. It argues that an astute marital decision might support and promote an ambitious actress's future on the stage, largely through integrating...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2002) 26 (3): 98–116.
Published: 01 September 2002
...- riage rites further the reform of unruly marriage practices at home, such as those celebrated at London’s Fleet and other flourishing urban clandestine marriage markets? I shall argue that the interests and categories within marriage-rites literature helped normalize the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2002) 26 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2002
... clandestine marriage even though he himself never married. In his first ECL26202-22-chiu.q4 5/28/02 2:15 PM Page 7 From Nobodaddies to Noble Daddies 7 published work, Fragment on Government (1776), written with the intent of earning enough to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2014) 38 (3): 1–29.
Published: 01 September 2014
... clandestine marriage to polyamory, to polygamy, to polyandry, scarcely a sexual permutation goes unimagined. Such themes drew charges of pru- rience from Darwin’s censorious contemporaries.2 Recent scholars have treated Darwin’s erotics more admiringly while conceding their masculin- ist cast.3 The...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2014) 38 (2): 127–134.
Published: 01 April 2014
...      131 Kelley, Theresa M. Clandestine Marriage: Botany and Romantic Culture (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ., 2012). Pp. xi + 342. 49 color ills. $55 Kennedy, Deborah. Poetic Sisters: Early Eighteenth-­Century Women Poets (Lewisburg: Bucknell Univ., 2013). Pp. xii + 303. 12 ills. $90...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2005) 29 (1): 23–49.
Published: 01 January 2005
... to be silent: “Be silent, and complying, you’ll soon fi nd, / Sir John, without a medicine will be kind.”3 The threat of losing the chance of marriage or the love and fi delity of one’s husband was the conventional stick for enjoining woman’s silence. Christopher Smart’s work is a locus of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2003) 27 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2003
... world of prejudice and sexual hypocrisy. Yet this world exists only in the female imagination, for Harley’s previous clandestine marriage makes Emma’s attachment to him impossible. Emma’s sexual offer is the climax of the delusional plot of romantic desire; and this is the moment critics read as...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2018) 42 (2): 15–37.
Published: 01 April 2018
... >, hereafter ODNB. Note that Frances Burney’s ODNB entry gives the marriage date as July. It is suggested (by Hemlow, History of Burney, , and CB Mem, ) that the marriage by license in St. George’s Chapel, Mayfair, may have been clandestine to keep their illegitimate child secret, but half of the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2011) 35 (1): 133–148.
Published: 01 January 2011
... Matthew Robinson and Elizabeth Montagu resisted the union. Eventually, Matthew Robinson reluc- tantly provided Scott with a dowry, but after the clandestine dissolution of the marriage in 1751, refused to support her in any way. The Plausible Selves of Sarah Scott (1721–95)     1 4 3...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2011) 35 (1): 102–118.
Published: 01 January 2011
... while he writes.7 The letters also purport to be conveying secret information: that there are actually few political secrets within these letters does not detract from the fact that Swift proclaims the clandestine nature of his information partly as a way of demonstrating his affection and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2015) 39 (1): 66–102.
Published: 01 January 2015
... London, and many of James’s followers drifted back to England and Ireland either clandestinely or with government permis- sion. An act passed in 1698 provided penalties for those who had served in 70   Eighteenth-Century Life James II’s army or who were in touch with his court, although the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2009) 33 (3): 1–36.
Published: 01 September 2009
..., involved herself after a scandalous elopement and a brief marriage in at least two public spectacles: an Oxford-based legal pro- ceeding in which she alleged being abducted by gownsmen, as well as so prolonged and public a dispute with her relatives that it included minor pamphlet wars with her aunt...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2017) 41 (1): 76–95.
Published: 01 January 2017
... the Earl of Rochester that appears both in Sir William Haward’s man- uscript miscellany and, later, in The Works of the late Duke of Buckingham, Bullard argues that the anonymous satires with which Haward happened to gather the poem make Rochester’s poem seem clandestine, fugitive...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2016) 40 (2): 1–35.
Published: 01 April 2016
... equality, although her presence on Shakespeare’s turf surely betrays our clandestine feminist agenda. Although separated by 200 years, the objects that embody the “It” factor of celebrity for Wil- liam Shakespeare and Jane Austen tell strikingly par- allel tales about how objects Figure 2...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2018) 42 (2): 73–93.
Published: 01 April 2018
... she is most insistently framed as an object to be observed, analyzed, and classed, accordingly, from Mortimer warning her that their clandestine meetings must “be food for conjecture, for enquiry, for wonder” to Mr. Delvile accusing her of sexual impropriety, based on his observation of her...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2004) 28 (1): 21–68.
Published: 01 January 2004