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Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 29–37.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Richard Terry; Helen Williams Our essay documents some of the issues we faced as modern editors of John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748–49). We were conscious of the groundbreaking earlier editions of Peter Sabor and Peter Wagner, and also of the particular difficulties posed by...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 8–14.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Peter Sabor This essay envisages what a new scholarly edition of John Cleland’s notorious novel, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748 – 49), might provide. Drawing on digital resources such as ECCO, it could readily refer to the full range of Cleland’s numerous publications, and taking advantage of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 58–75.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Norbert Schürer While John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , also known as Fanny Hill , seems to be mostly obsessed with sexual activity, it is actually just as much about the burgeoning free-market capitalist economy of mid- eighteenth-century England. In the explicit references to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 76–104.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Laura J. Rosenthal While appreciating the author’s skill, critics have nevertheless characterized John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure as little more than a string of pornographic vignettes held together with the barest of plots and populated by superficial characters mechanically...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 38–57.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Hal Gladfelder In the wake of the court cases that led to the clearing for publication of Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , a handful of publishers rushed other more or less erotic eighteenth-century novels into print, eager to cash in on the new celebrity of Fanny Hill (as it was usually known). In...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 20–28.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Jaydeep Chipalkatti John Cleland’s novel Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (popularly known as Fanny Hill ) is a classic of eighteenth- century English erotica. This article contains a brief discussion of some of the linguistic and stylistic decisions taken by the author in his Marathi translation of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 162–187.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Simon Stern This essay discusses John Cleland’s novel The Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748–49), better known as Fanny Hill ), in the context of eighteenth-century obscenity law and the law of search and seizure. To explain why obscenity could have been treated as a criminal offense at all, the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 137–161.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Clorinda Donato This study charts the resonance of John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , known more commonly as Fanny Hill , in the Italian peninsula in the long eighteenth century. It discusses and compares four different editions of Italian translations of the novel as well as its...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 105–136.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Carolyn D. Williams Attempts to find connections between Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure and Cleland’s etymological tracts, in which he attempted to recover the ancient Celtic language, have, so far, met with mixed success. The most promising approach is to relate them to their broader contexts...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2003) 27 (2): 1–22.
Published: 01 April 2003
... rejoinder, Memoirs of Modern Philosophers (1800). The female reader of the novel reads a novel about a woman reading a novel; and these mise en abymes,or embedded scenes of novel-reading, provide internal mirrors for how the reader ought to read Emma Courtney and Modern Philosophers.In what follows, I...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2018) 42 (2): 152–169.
Published: 01 April 2018
...-Century Life doing, she o°ered a counterpoint to the version of professional identity that she had sought to uphold throughout her previous career, in which the woman writer preserves respectability through her domestic identity. Boswellian Biography: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Hawkins Publishers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2013) 37 (3): 1–28.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Burney’s conceptions of and ruminations on authorial celebrity in old age. The narration of the Memoirs provides a compelling picture of what an aged woman author was up against in fashioning a persona in her text. Examining the complicated reception of the Memoirs also advances our discussion of Burney’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2018) 42 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 January 2018
... performing close readings of two of Behn’s most complex and perverse runaway-woman narratives, Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and his Sister (1684-87) and The History of the Nun (1688), this essay recalibrates our sense of Behn’s connection with and contribution to what would come to be called the women’s...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2006) 30 (2): 48–73.
Published: 01 April 2006
... century, Myers includes everyone from Mary Wollstonecraft to Hannah More in this favorable assessment, seeing in More’s didactic writings for children and for the lower classes “a woman’s brand of bourgeois progressivism” that “reproved the rich and improved the poor,” a “maternal thinking...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2012) 36 (2): 111–142.
Published: 01 April 2012
...-­woman entered with a sore-­eyed Child; the inside of whose Eyelids he very charitably tore out with a Beard of Corn, under which cruel Operation the Girl fainted, but he said that was good for her: It may be so, for by two-­headed Janus Nature has framed strange Doctors in her...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2015) 39 (3): 1–32.
Published: 01 September 2015
... version of the New Woman, a type of the independent woman (figures 7 and 8). Likewise, Donald sees the one-eyed, one-legged naval hero as both type and real person. Identifying him as Admiral Hood, not Admiral Paisley, she regards this figure as another counterpoint, the true Englishman who...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2018) 42 (2): 73–93.
Published: 01 April 2018
... might be placed. Spencer contends that “the female intellectual . . . arouses in [Burney] intense anxiety, and she distances herself from this –gure. . . . The man of letters [conversely], is seen as ultimately benevolent to the properly gentle and unpretentious woman.”33 Schellenberg argues...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2013) 37 (2): 85–103.
Published: 01 April 2013
... merges the two narratives and then entirely subsumes the eco- nomic plot within the courtship plot, debunking two unstated postulations of arguments for and against clandestine marriage made by both politi- cians and novelists: first, that if a woman engages in appropriate court- ship practices and...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2017) 41 (2): 154–170.
Published: 01 April 2017
... Austen’s earlier fictions, Persuasion’s characters display a preoccupation with bloodlines, breeding, and inheri- tance. Elizabeth Elliot, a single woman nearing the brink of unmarriage- able age, waits to be “properly solicited by baronet-blood” (7). Sir Wal- ter’s heir, the distant cousin Mr...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2013) 37 (1): 51–71.
Published: 01 January 2013
... left in his care were in fact their children. News arrives that Charles XII has suf- fered a great defeat — ​the Battle of Poltava — ​and Dorilaus and Louisa fear that Horatio is dead. However, his honorable behavior towards a woman, and his loyalty to a friend, have as their end result his...