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John Cleland

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Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2014) 38 (1): 102–106.
Published: 01 January 2014
...Mark Blackwell Gladfelder Hal . Fanny Hill in Bombay: The Making and Unmaking of John Cleland . ( Baltimore : Johns Hopkins Univ. , 2012 ). Pp. xii + 311 . $54.95 Copyright 2013 by Duke University Press 2013 Review Essay Should John...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 38–57.
Published: 01 April 2019
... one case, the 1963 Lancer edition of the “suppressed sequel to Fanny Hill,” Memoirs of a Coxcomb , the work in question was certainly Cleland’s. But in two other cases, mildly racy eighteenth-century “memoirs” were blazoned on their covers as “by the Author of Fanny Hill,” despite the absence of any...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 29–37.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Richard Terry; Helen Williams Our essay documents some of the issues we faced as modern editors of John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748–49). We were conscious of the groundbreaking earlier editions of Peter Sabor and Peter Wagner, and also of the particular difficulties posed by...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 162–187.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Simon Stern This essay discusses John Cleland’s novel The Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748–49), better known as Fanny Hill ), in the context of eighteenth-century obscenity law and the law of search and seizure. To explain why obscenity could have been treated as a criminal offense at all, the...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 8–14.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Peter Sabor This essay envisages what a new scholarly edition of John Cleland’s notorious novel, Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (1748 – 49), might provide. Drawing on digital resources such as ECCO, it could readily refer to the full range of Cleland’s numerous publications, and taking advantage of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 76–104.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Laura J. Rosenthal While appreciating the author’s skill, critics have nevertheless characterized John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure as little more than a string of pornographic vignettes held together with the barest of plots and populated by superficial characters mechanically...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 20–28.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Jaydeep Chipalkatti John Cleland’s novel Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure (popularly known as Fanny Hill ) is a classic of eighteenth- century English erotica. This article contains a brief discussion of some of the linguistic and stylistic decisions taken by the author in his Marathi translation of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 137–161.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Clorinda Donato This study charts the resonance of John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , known more commonly as Fanny Hill , in the Italian peninsula in the long eighteenth century. It discusses and compares four different editions of Italian translations of the novel as well as its...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2019) 43 (2): 58–75.
Published: 01 April 2019
...Norbert Schürer While John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , also known as Fanny Hill , seems to be mostly obsessed with sexual activity, it is actually just as much about the burgeoning free-market capitalist economy of mid- eighteenth-century England. In the explicit references to...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2007) 31 (1): 22–38.
Published: 01 January 2007
... of these documents is a now well-known letter from the imprisoned novelist John Cleland to Newcastle’s law clerk Lovel Stanhope, in which Cleland compares his own case to that of “the Son of a Dean and Grandson of a Bishop [who] was mad and wicked enough to Publish a Pamphlet evidently in...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2013) 37 (1): 133–143.
Published: 01 January 2013
... John Cleland (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ., 2012). Pp. xii + 311. $54.95 Glover, Katharine. Elite Women and Polite Society in Eighteenth-­Century Scotland (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2011). Pp. ix + 217. $95 Golightly, Jennifer. The Family, Marriage, and Radicalism in British Women’s Novels...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2006) 30 (3): 78–106.
Published: 01 September 2006
..., Cartesian distinction between animated movement without reason or soul, and genuine human life. Machines, seen as artifi cial life, merely mimicked humans. In John Cleland’s Memoirs of a Coxcomb (1751), for example, the frustrated narrator Sir William Delamore demonstrates this distinction between...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2012) 36 (3): 133–137.
Published: 01 September 2012
... judiciously to describe the debate amongst philosophers and theologians from the period: we get clear accounts of the public debate on free will between Hobbes and the Anglican theologian John Bramhall in the 1650s; the continua- tion of this debate in the second decade of the eighteenth century between...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2011) 35 (3): 60–80.
Published: 01 September 2011
... as a means to social capital as well as national representation. Watson also draws on the symbolic capital of the book, a form that, according to John Brewer, increasingly connoted “culture and gentility in the eighteenth century.” 2 4 Many of the poems that Watson includes in his...