1-20 of 83 Search Results for

Horace Walpole

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 147–169.
Published: 01 April 2001
...John Wilton-Ely The College of William & Mary 2001 “Gingerbread and sippets of embroidery”: Horace Walpole and Robert Adam “How sick one shall be, after this chaste palace, of Mr Adam’s gingerbread and sippets...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 74–97.
Published: 01 January 2020
...Andrew Rudd In this article, I examine how notions of charity shaped eighteenth-century literature. I begin by examining Horace Walpole’s philanthropy, which I argue belied his posthumous reputation for miserliness, and proceed to trace the theme of charity in Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (2): 111–135.
Published: 01 April 2020
...Luisa Calè In “A Friendly Gathering: The Social Politics of Presentation Books and their Extra-Illustration in Horace Walpole’s Circle,” Lucy Peltz plays with the technical and metaphorical senses of “gathering” to reflect on the materiality and sociability of altered books in the Strawberry Hill...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (1): 1–29.
Published: 01 January 2012
...Yael Shapira This essay considers the limited presence of the dead body in Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto . The near absence of gory death from the novella is striking, given both its intensive borrowing from Shakespeare’s Hamlet and its status as the founding work of the Gothic tradition...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 135–157.
Published: 01 September 2021
..., “Horace Walpole's Journals of Visits to Country Seats,” Volume of the Walpole Society 16 (1927): 9–80. 69. Paget Toynbee, The Letters of Horace Walpole, Fourth Earl of Orford , 16 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon, 1903), 3:167. 68. Arthur Young, A Six Weeks Tour, Through the Southern Counties...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (1): 84–101.
Published: 01 January 2018
... why he did not write it up in a scholarly fashion under his own name. According to Horace Walpole in his Description of the Villa of Horace Walpole (1774), he bought the painting now in the Lewis Walpole Library from the John Rich Sale at Langford’s on 2 April 1762 (lot 79) for five guineas...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2012) 36 (2): 111–142.
Published: 01 April 2012
... into the eighteenth century, spreading to the middling classes, and sprouting a crop of connoisseur groups, like the Antiquarian Society, that were dedi- cated to accumulating and studying various classes of objects.3 Throughout the period, notable collectors of art, such as Horace Walpole, the Duchess...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (1): 110–113.
Published: 01 January 2021
... century, and the idea that Beckford sought to outdo Walpole is acknowledged in J. G. Lockhart s reference to him in an 1834 Quarterly Review essay as a male Horace Walpole, as superior to the silken Baron, as Fonthill, with its York- like tower embosomed among hoary Crazy Enthusiasm 1 1 3 forests...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 59–72.
Published: 01 April 2017
... 1769, Walpole wrote to his correspondent, Horace Mann, that “I am to dine tomorrow with the famous Mrs. Macaulay along with the duc de La Rochefoucault. She is one of the sights that all foreign- ers are carried to see. Did you know this young Duke? He is very amiable and worthy—much more worthy...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2008) 32 (1): 96–98.
Published: 01 January 2008
... specifically, homoerotic desire is seen to be the essence of what is repressed for the sake of establishing bourgeois culture, which is “always already” heteronormative. Homosexuals who suffer from this repression gain a kind of revenge by demonizing heteronormative relations, as does Horace Walpole...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 116–141.
Published: 01 January 2017
... Hanbury Williams including The Country Girl: An Ode (1742); The Old Coachman: A New Ballad (1742); and S--ND--S and J--K--L (Sandys and Jekyll). A New Ballad (1st ed. undated, 3rd ed. 1743); as well as Horace Walpole’s Lessons for the Day (1741 and 1742).6 Webb soon recycled these in The New Min...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (2): 94–111.
Published: 01 April 2018
... £gures of the day amongst his friends, including: Edward Gibbon; Sir Joshua Reynolds; David Garrick; Horace Walpole, who praises him as “Cambridge, the every thing”; and Samuel Johnson.5 A minor poet and essayist, who con- tributed frequently to the periodical the World, his best-known work...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 170–182.
Published: 01 April 2001
... by “the many Macaroni figures he saw in every print shop,” which led him to attack the generic breed, with “no particular person or persons in view.’17 However, Horace Walpole recognized the specificity of many of the Darly satires and annotated his own collection of macaroni...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (3): 70–98.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., was then the thing to do. Flowers were planted in square or rectangular beds (parterres); shrubs were cut into geometrical, animal, or human shapes; and not only trees but everything else was lined up as in military ranks. In the 1780s, Horace Walpole would celebrate the English garden as what is suited only...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 20–43.
Published: 01 September 2005
... rmness which is necessary to stand the storms of state.”4 And for another contemporary, Horace Walpole, Bute’s lack of competence meant that “infi nite ill has he occasioned to this country,” yet “in other respects, the meanness of his abilities and the poorness of his spirit place him below...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2022) 46 (2): 88–112.
Published: 01 April 2022
... articulation throughout the early century and would be given further credence by the case of Charles Nourse who, in 1741, according to Horace Walpole, after having been denied an opportunity to duel, subsequently “went home and cut his own throat.” 30 Dueling's potential to disguise suicidal intent...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (2): 1–28.
Published: 01 April 2007
... to be found at Elephanta, Salsette, and Ellora.14 In a letter in 1785, Horace Walpole expressed horror at the speculations of Soci- ety members, a number of whom argued the precedence of Oriental over Greek sculpture. He complains that the learned have the impertinence to tell one...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (1): 76–95.
Published: 01 January 2017
... scholarship by James McLaverty argues that this may have been Pope’s doing (Grundy, Comet, 516). By 1747, Horace Walpole had arranged for Lady Mary’s Town Eclogues with some other Poems to be published under her initials, and soon after that, ten of her poems appeared in the first edi- tion of Robert...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2018) 42 (1): 124–129.
Published: 01 January 2018
... Hooke and Horace Walpole, as well as in more idiosyncratic figures like John Woodward and Laetitia Pilkington, as well as figures at home in eighteenth-century studies, if not typically thought of as collectors (John Mil- ton) or even writers (Jonathan Wild). “Home” turns out to be a crucial concep...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2005) 29 (3): 97–101.
Published: 01 September 2005
... perspective, color, and — almost — vision itself. The glasses (owned by Thomas Gray, Horace Walpole, and Roger de Piles, among others, but distrusted by William Gilpin and John Ruskin) are themselves mysterious. The distortions and unease they produce are so extreme that they have been at times prohib...