1-20 of 28 Search Results for

Hooke

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2019) 43 (1): 50–75.
Published: 01 January 2019
...Rachel Mann Through the figures of Jane Barker, a gentlewoman who lived from 1652 to 1732, and whose work was both circulated in manuscripts as well as print, and Robert Hooke, curator to the Royal Society, this essay shows that experimental science and manuscript culture were premised on a...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2008) 32 (2): 120–137.
Published: 01 April 2008
... tradesmen to be elected.12 Robert Hooke, though more famous, has something in common with Moxon, whom he knew well. Both worked closely with scientific instru- ments, and both were separated by their work from the leisured gentlemen Crusoe’s Hand     1 2 3...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2010) 34 (3): 51–54.
Published: 01 September 2010
... rags and hung them on hooks on the wall so that the nurses could go about their daily work without the burden of their charges.” By the nineteenth century a revolution in child rearing had taken place, according to Popiel, and “Jean-­Jacques Rous- seau’s work drove this shift in perception” (5...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2013) 37 (1): 125–128.
Published: 01 January 2013
... hundreds of comments on small points in the text and figured out that the neglected letter digamma with the consonantal sound “w” is active in many lines that other- wise present problems of scansion. Bentley’s “hook,” as Pope calls the digamma in the Dunciad, may be Bentley’s most infamous brand...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2018) 42 (1): 124–129.
Published: 01 January 2018
... eighteenth-centuryists would expect, such as Robert Hooke and Horace Walpole, as well as in more idiosyncratic figures like John Woodward and Laetitia Pilkington, as well as figures at home in eighteenth-century studies, if not typically thought of as collectors (John Mil- ton) or even writers...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2008) 32 (3): 181–188.
Published: 01 September 2008
... Honesty (in politics), 7, 20, 38, 41, 48, George, prince of Denmark, 71; 65, 71 proposed as captain-general of the Hook, Henry, 77 Dutch forces, 30; inspects fleet at Hooper, George, Dean of Canterbury, 52 Portsmouth, 31 Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2013) 37 (3): 29–54.
Published: 01 September 2013
..., more broadly, in knowledge production) that were occurring in the early eighteenth century. Dampier published New Voy- age at a time when the Royal Society was attempting to implement a new standard for scientific travel writing, and when the society was, as Robert Hooke explains in 1681, hungry...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2006) 30 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2006
... number of commentators have wondered about this unlikely — not to say unholy — alliance between critics equally wedded to and hostile towards notions of a Scottish cultural identity in the eighteenth century. As early as 1984 Andrew Hook wondered whether regarding The Poems of Ossian as a source...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2010) 34 (3): 114–123.
Published: 01 September 2010
... writers of scientific experi- mentalism and their literary contemporaries and respondents, namely Hooke, Boyle, Swift, Evelyn, and Pepys. Chapter 2 journeys through consonant if not identical spaces, revealing the direction of the entire book by emphasizing the intersection between the visual...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2012) 36 (1): 82–92.
Published: 01 January 2012
... the “seeming contradiction” (198) in the relationship between art and science, drawing upon an array of writers, from Bacon, Sprat, Hooke, and Wotton, to Dryden, Hume, Burke, and Johnson. According to McKeon, each of these writers, in a variety of ways, addresses the mutual implications of...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2012) 36 (3): 112–122.
Published: 01 September 2012
... thought that Clarissa was at fault in some way, which I do not believe, he does not let Lovelace off the hook. So heinous are Lovelace’s crimes that there is no redemption for him here or hereafter. Despite the urgent pleas of Rich- ardson’s readers to allow Clarissa and Lovelace to marry, Richardson...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2013) 37 (2): 140–150.
Published: 01 April 2013
... obligation to do, to let you, finally, off the hook. And in the end, the Revolu- tion’s happiness project turned out to be just another way of ushering felicity out the door. To judge by Soni’s recent essays, he seems to be gearing up to give a similar account of judgment, a concept Locke, Hutcheson...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2007) 31 (3): 115–126.
Published: 01 September 2007
... the separation of spheres, but also about how the constitution of public masculinity itself impinges on any theorization of colonial guilt” (223). Of additional note in this chapter is O’Quinn’s close reading of James Hook’s 1778 satiric print on the Hastings trial, entitled The Trial, which...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2011) 35 (1): 51–64.
Published: 01 January 2011
... respondent. In his letters to Bradshaigh, he quotes heavily from letters he has received and marks his answers to correspondents’ points in turn with square hooks. At one point during their correspondence in 1754, Richardson suggests to Bradshaigh that they number their paragraphs, “1, 2, 3, 4, &c...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2000) 24 (3): 31–52.
Published: 01 September 2000
... foot- steps of Nature are to be trac’d, not only in her ordinary course, but when she seems to be put to her shifts, to make many doublings and turnings, and to use some kind of art in indeavouring to avoid our discovery” [Hooke, “Preface,” Micrographia, p...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2003) 27 (3): 1–30.
Published: 01 September 2003
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 April 2001) 25 (2): 116–134.
Published: 01 April 2001
... for private conversations, for political deals, for making social contacts that would be inconceivable indoors. Remarkably little takes place indoors in silverfork novels. The hero of Theodore Hook’s Jack Brag (1837) simply rents the door of a great house in Grosvenor...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2003) 27 (1): 85–106.
Published: 01 January 2003
... this point. A neighbor found Cheek “kneeling over the body of [her] child, cut plainly with a chicken hook lying by bloody.” When asked why she did it, Cheek “said nothing but that she should be hanged and knew nothing of the matter.” A clergyman who saw Cheek...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 January 2001) 25 (1): 1–16.
Published: 01 January 2001
... with erotic interest in other women. Yet, what strikes me about these comedies is how easily they let such characters off the hook: “condemnation” is far too strong a word for these characters’ fates. The question is why they are not treated more harshly. The...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (1 September 2003) 27 (3): 31–52.
Published: 01 September 2003