1-20 of 30 Search Results for

Democracy

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2020) 44 (1): 49–73.
Published: 01 January 2020
... the law, he also calls on them to take a greater part in enforcing them. Copyright 2020 by Duke University Press 2020 Henry Fielding Agency Democracy Law Social Classes Eighteenth- Century Life Volume 44, Number 1, January 2020 doi 10.1215/00982601-7993644 Copyright 2020 by Duke University...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2015) 39 (3): 87–91.
Published: 01 September 2015
... Contrat Social the “worst work ever written on government” and called Rousseau’s defense of democracy “absurd” (75). It is with regard to Rousseau, however, that Craiutu’s warm admiration for the moderates gets the better of him slightly. Although he acknowledges the selectivity...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2009) 33 (1): 144–147.
Published: 01 January 2009
... their own street culture. After the Revolution, in order to support the ideal of respectable democracy, the elite classes construed themselves as “the citizenry,” relegating the lower classes to “the rabble,” turning sexually independent women into unruly streetwalkers, and African-Americans...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 214–224.
Published: 01 April 2001
..., ethnicity, and to a limited degree gender, Gracian and a line of worldly philosophers and aestheticians had made taste and its cultivation the great democratizing force.18 When Joseph Addison in 1710 explained the democracy of the English clubs, he observed “Our...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2021) 45 (3): 1–15.
Published: 01 September 2021
...,” in The Cambridge Companion to the French Enlightenment , ed. Daniel Brewer (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ., 2014), 14–28. Jonathan Israel, in A Revolution of the Mind: Enlightenment and the Intellectual Origins of Modern Democracy (Princeton: Princeton Univ., 2010), returning to the Enlightenment's political...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (2): 61–86.
Published: 01 April 2004
... in on all sides.” I shall argue that such an accommodation is something of a fudge in Godwin’s text, as in empiricism generally, and that the resultant doubt rever- berates around the whole of Political Justice. Godwin, as we know, denies the possibility of a just democracy in favor of a virtuous...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 76–91.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., his is in fact a study of political theory. More precisely, it tests whether the “liberal consensus propounded by Alexis de Tocqueville in Democracy in America (1835, 1840) and Louis Hartz in The Liberal Tradi- tion in America (1955) is a more appropriate analytic system for examining...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2014) 38 (3): 158–164.
Published: 01 September 2014
... in Burney’s critique, taste’s two moments are seamlessly connected: initial pleasure leads to spending, and so consuming, and so furthering the progress of the nation, which in turn creates enlightened sentiments, equality, even democracy. This virtuous conjunction of interests shows how taste works...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (3): 135–141.
Published: 01 September 2006
... Marks, Jonathan. Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau (Cambridge: Cambridge Univ., 2005). Pp. 191. $60. ISBN 0-521-85069-x Maslan, Susan. Revolutionary Acts: Theater, Democracy, and the French Revolution (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Univ., 2005). Pp. 275. $50. ISBN...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2013) 37 (3): 95–104.
Published: 01 September 2013
... is poorer for it. Whether criticized as instrumental reason, cele- brated as deliberative democracy, or embraced as a project of emancipation, the Enlightenment sorely needs a discussion of its possibilities and limits. There was clearly a split in the larger culture between post-­structuralism...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2006) 30 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., notes that “such were the rude elements which time has improved into the present constitution of English government” (308). Or again, Anglo-Saxon democracy, according to Macpherson, was derived not from a “love of liberty,” which lay behind the “democratical meet- ings” of the Celts, but merely...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2003) 27 (1): 130–138.
Published: 01 January 2003
...-16056-4 Downes, Paul. Democracy, Revolution, and Monarchism in Early American Literature (New York: Cambridge Univ., 2002). Pp. 252. $55. ISBN 0-521-81339-5 Dresser, Madge. Slavery Obscured: The Social History of the Slave Trade in an English...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (2): 113–119.
Published: 01 April 2004
.... 288. $24.95. ISBN 1-56858-231-5 Yu,Christopher. Nothing to Admire: The Politics of Poetic Satire from Dryden to Merrill (New York: Oxford Univ., 2003). Pp. 232. $45. ISBN 0-19-515530-0 Zakim, Michael. Ready-Made Democracy: A History of Men’s Dress in the American Republic, 1760–1860...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2004) 28 (2): 120–124.
Published: 01 April 2004
.... 288. $24.95. ISBN 1-56858-231-5 Yu,Christopher. Nothing to Admire: The Politics of Poetic Satire from Dryden to Merrill (New York: Oxford Univ., 2003). Pp. 232. $45. ISBN 0-19-515530-0 Zakim, Michael. Ready-Made Democracy: A History of Men’s Dress in the American Republic, 1760–1860...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 115–126.
Published: 01 September 2007
... use of Montesquieu’s theories of monarchy to critique imperial governance in her 1787 play Such Things Are. O’Quinn maintains that Inchbald explores “notions of virtue, honor, and fear, which lie at the heart of Montesquieu’s theorization of democracy, monarchy, and despotism, respectively...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2007) 31 (3): 29–59.
Published: 01 September 2007
... of dress] in its germinal stages have been so well heated, and watered” (466). As they explain, the “American bathroom evolved in a democracy with no servant class,” while the Englishman was, by contrast, a “hero” who “took his daily tub in a large cold room with nothing more heartening than an open...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2001) 25 (2): 170–182.
Published: 01 April 2001
...). 23. For a discussion of the wider implications of these ideas, see Shearer West, “The De-formed Face of Democracy: Class, Comedy and Character in Eighteenth-Century Brit- ish Portraiture,” in Culture and Society in Britain 1660–1800, ed. Jeremy Black (Manchester...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 43–58.
Published: 01 April 2017
... and modern manners. This historiographical position was most thoroughly elaborated by the so-called Scottish School of social theorists, historians, and philosophers. Less likely to approve radical calls for exten- sive democracy, women’s rights, or the withering away of government and private...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 59–72.
Published: 01 April 2017
... well disposed towards democracy, such as Jean Paul Marat (1743–93) and Jacques-Pierre Brissot de Warville (1754–93), whom Macaulay considered her “great friend.”22 Brissot returned the compliment. He spent 1782–84 in London, hop- ing to establish himself as an educator and writer, but his...
Journal Article
Eighteenth-Century Life (2017) 41 (2): 105–121.
Published: 01 April 2017
... an important artisanal value by insisting, again quoting “Cato,” that liberty required a man “to call his tongue his own,” a notion as relevant to defending popular culture as to establishing modern democracy (1:3). Similar imagery pervaded chapbooks and street ballads, which com- prised the bulk...