Culturally bound and socially contested, race has been debated by humanities and social science scholars over the last century in terms of its arbitrary definition, ambiguous categorization, and implications that disseminate into various social arenas.

This debate has increased in the past two decades. On the one hand, evolving networks of commerce, information, and labor complicate our understanding of the political world, in which traditional national boundaries become blurred and are no longer dominant. On the other hand, the proliferation of sequenced genomes—first a white male done by the Human Genome Project and then several others from different populations—created an emerging map of race and science, in which, as Donna Haraway (1997: 218) predicted, genome is both its language and the key object. The two trends not only bring race to a global scale where new approaches and perspectives are much needed, but...

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