Angela Ki Che Leung's book traces the long history of leprosy in China from antiquity (fourth century bc) to the recent past (the 1990s). Reviewing the history of a disease over two thousand years across a vast territory is a daunting challenge, but Leung has succeeded thanks to her effective strategy. Her account impresses the reader with its meticulous and eye-opening detail; I believe this work will oblige both Chinese and Western scholars to reconsider how they think about illness and medicine in China.

Leung uses the case of leprosy to argue for an alternative historiography of Chinese medical discourse. Her introduction contextualizes leprosy in China globally, a contribution to Dipesh Chakrabarty's crusade to “provincialize Europe” (16). This is an effort to portray “multisited histories of postcolonial medicine” (16), a reference to Warwick Anderson's ideas about non-Western medical history. Although Leung seems...

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