The substantial and insightful articles in this special issue address different cultural, societal, and regulatory problems of health care in contemporary medicine. They include expectations of what good care is, challenges arising from social contexts, and embedded norms affecting practices of care. To these empirical studies, I wish to contribute a perspective from feminist philosophy and care ethics that engages with issues in these articles.

Carol Gilligan’s relational care ethics and Susan Sherwin’s approach to a global feminist ethics of health care are my entry points for that discussion. In In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development, Gilligan ([1982] 1993) examines moral judgment empirically and discusses ethical reflections in children, adolescents, and adults, critiquing gender-biased ideals of good moral reasoning. She rejects the view that the most advanced form of moral judgment is characterized by an emphasis...

You do not currently have access to this content.