It was not until I was asked by Keller's former student at MIT Wen-Hua Kuo to write this article that I realized Evelyn Fox Keller, in the form of her intellectual fruits, has been with me for a quarter of a century. Her 1985 book Reflections on Gender and Science (hereafter Reflections) was on my MA qualification examination list in 1991 at National Tsing Hua University, along with Sandra Harding's 1987 The Science Question in Feminism. I entered the Graduate Institute of History at Tsing Hua University in 1989, two years after Taiwan had lifted martial law. At that time, social movements were vibrant; student dissenters of various political persuasions, including environmentalists, Taiwan study groups, Marxists, and feminists, were flourishing on campus. In retrospect, it seems to me the timing was perfect for reading Keller's books—women's movements were going...

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