Before becoming active in the history and philosophy of science, Evelyn Fox Keller had worked in physics, in mathematical biology, and also in feminist theory.1 Many know about her publications in that last field. However, it is perhaps less known to historians and philosophers of science that her contributions to mathematical biology are still often quoted by practitioners of this field.2 In fact, as the article on which this issue comments and many others amply demonstrate, Keller never gave up participating actively in the reflection about life sciences, in particular genetics, and interacting with biologists.3 It is from this perspective that we can read her article about scientific cultures for what it reveals about scientific cultures.

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Keller's starting point in this article is the conviction that the language currently used by biologists and primarily by geneticists might hinder...

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