This coauthored book traces the history of clinical labor by situating it against one hundred years of change in labor law and industrial relations in advanced economies. Melinda Cooper and Catherine Waldby, both specialists in sociology and social policy, pursue the theme of how wider dynamics in labor law, welfare regimes, and (de)industrialization influence the condition of clinical labor. In terms of method, the authors focus on discourses and practices in the life sciences as a means to generate narratives, organized by theme and chapter, that explore how ideas found in legal rulings as well as those in scholarly works on law, economics, and ethics have (de)legitimized particular sets of practices in the biomedical industry, and vice versa, over time.

Of particular significance to understanding today's condition of labor in the biomedical industry is the legal principle volenti non fit injuria...

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