For historians of health and medicine, Southeast Asia is a fascinating area to explore. It has been ravaged by cholera, malaria, the plague, smallpox, yellow fever, dysentery, and several other diseases; today, it is associated with the avian flu and SARS. During the eras of imperial exploration and colonial settlement, Europeans were plagued by fear about the threats that disease posed to their health, not without reason, as white settlements were often decimated by disease. Disease does not recognize borders and imperial divides; the health challenges that Southeast Asian countries have faced have been, and continue to be, the same. Yet the response to these health challenges has varied considerably, depending on the state of medical knowledge at the time, population density, population movement, the nature of colonial administration, and the organization of medical services. Southeast Asia was colonized by the...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.