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mouth

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Journal Article
differences (1 September 2015) 26 (2): 29–60.
Published: 01 September 2015
... direct as men of learning to the reading public. If left free, this address, argues Kant, enables us to become mündig (mature) or, in other words, to learn to think and act for ourselves. Kant’s vision invokes the mouth ( Mund ) along with other bodily media of address (reading, writing). Presenting the...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2016) 27 (1): 176–188.
Published: 01 May 2016
...Gertrud Koch The music video poses several questions in which the ordering of the senses becomes central: What does it mean to show a singing body, a close-up of a singer and her body parts (her open mouth, her hands, her lips, etc.)? Does the music video emphasize sight over hearing by becoming...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2010) 21 (3): 73–96.
Published: 01 December 2010
... brute repetitive nutrition that mark low or ordinary cuisine. Put another way, aspic may be thought of as the distillation of a cuisine less concerned with the (vis- ceral) taste of a mouth machine and more concerned with the...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 1999) 11 (2): 1–21.
Published: 01 September 1999
..., two open-mouthed fish repeat the dumb grimace of its mouth, above which we see its tragic “eyes,” which would in fact be the gills of this fish. In the lower right quadrant of the picture we see a knife, which conceivably is the very one that...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2016) 27 (3): 119–131.
Published: 01 December 2016
... feely thought, the “thinking-feeling.” “ethics of the other”—onto where? Read my lips, didn’t I say, watch your mouth, did you say. Shouldn’t I rest my case there, then, unsettling as it is, huffering between suffering and buffering, so to speak: How should one lip think with the other, not...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2012) 23 (1): 32–61.
Published: 01 May 2012
... multifarious anatomy—her axial mouth, slinking tentacles, innumerable suction cups—renders through its metonymic slippage the “uncertainty” 34 On Octopussies of a female genital...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2006) 17 (3): 52–68.
Published: 01 December 2006
... not think his own self—since he has abundance of material wealth—deserves study, but Aurora’s careful obser- vation indicates that she does. She observes particularly the “character” of his mouth. Romney’s mouth is “twice graver...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2016) 27 (1): 1–24.
Published: 01 May 2016
... figured by a gaping, voracious open mouth that will not, or cannot, receive the nourishment it needs. A mouth that cannot receive food becomes a gaping void, an abyss, a yawning chasm that swallows the world. The poem posits a world in which the only two figures that presumably could provide healthy...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2004) 15 (1): 84–107.
Published: 01 May 2004
... pet-owners talk to their beloved “pet animals” as though they were human;3 half of these also put words into the mouths of their animals, just as if they were God opening the mouth of Balaam’s mule. Thus even James Russell Lowell...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2010) 21 (1): 63–73.
Published: 01 May 2010
..., convinced Lacan that Freud was correct to put this question, “Am I a man or a woman in the mouth of the female subject, but Lacan rephrased the question that torments the male subject. “Where do babies come from?” becomes “Have I been...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2008) 19 (1): 71–95.
Published: 01 May 2008
..., which glides down to her mouth and deeper into her throat. A collective shudder darts through the audience as Chouinard’s abdomen contracts convulsively [. .  What may have been an eroticized...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2011) 22 (2-3): 10–30.
Published: 01 December 2011
... res cogitans by exploring resonance and its interconnections with three terms that recur in his work with remarkable regularity: resonare, concutere, and sympathia. A Man Opens His Mouth...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2017) 28 (2): 46–64.
Published: 01 September 2017
... could speak for him- or herself). Maturity, Mündigkeit as the German language puts it, is (if we can let this German signifier guide us) to have a Mund , a mouth to speak with, and not to have a guardian or Vor-mund , a pre-mouth or fore-mouth, speaking for and before one. Being a child, one finds...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2016) 27 (3): 45–92.
Published: 01 December 2016
... of laughter, which lasted some minutes, when it suddenly changed to a cry of pain and she fell to the floor. Blood gushed from her nose and mouth and medical assistance was summoned, but before anything could be done [. . .] she was dead” (“Killed”). Stories such as these, evidently, revealed women’s...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2010) 21 (1): 194–208.
Published: 01 May 2010
... gut is a privileged site for the operations of infant phantasy. Where Freud’s theory of mind speaks to the importance of the surfaces and openings of the body in early infancy (the mouth and the anus), Klein digs down into 204...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2004) 15 (3): 66–94.
Published: 01 December 2004
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2001) 12 (3): 33–68.
Published: 01 December 2001
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2008) 19 (2): 1–8.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of mouth, always there is a puddle—a murky, unnavigable space that is overcrowded with intangibles: shame, remorse, vanity, morbidity, silence. (7) Walker’s comments indicate a certain unease with this...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2008) 19 (3): 150–157.
Published: 01 December 2008
...,” a passage in which Butler asks (with reference to Monique Wittig), “Why don’t we name as sexual features our mouths, hands, and backs? Her [Wittig’s] answer: we only name sexual [. . .] those features functional in reproductive...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2011) 22 (2-3): 140–167.
Published: 01 December 2011
... mother (“The milk-giver is in the next room. And yet I am here but also through the first tentative babblings of speech (fort-da—“here-there Weaned from the soothing sounds from the mother’s mouth—the aural substitute for the...