1-20 of 30 Search Results for

mistress

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2018) 29 (2): 191–195.
Published: 01 September 2018
... prestige and protection after the Civil War. Particularly concerned with the degree to which the right to marry among African Americans affected—in truly affective ways—the institution of marriage among whites, especially for the plantation mistress whose own (un)holy wedlock occurred within the context of...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2003) 14 (3): 57–88.
Published: 01 December 2003
.... Vermeer, Johannes. Mistress and Maid . Frick Collection, New York. Wheelock, Arthur K., Jr. Vermeer and the Art of Painting . New Haven: Yale up, 1995 . Wynter, Sylvia. “Rethinking `Aesthetics': Notes towards a Deciphering Practice.” Ex- Iles: Essays on Caribbean Cinema . Ed. Mbye Cham. Trenton...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2012) 23 (1): 131–150.
Published: 01 May 2012
.... In Deleuze’s reading, Venus in Furs, Sacher-Masoch’s tale of youthful torture at the hands of a Slavic aristocrat (a cold, cruel mistress), becomes emblematic not only of ethnic resistance but also of the ideology behind...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2006) 17 (3): 107–125.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., Flaubert makes it difficult to distinguish grammatically between the subject status of Félicité and that of her mistress, Mme Aubain, by alternating between descriptions of the two women, each of whom is designated only by the...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2018) 29 (2): 21–67.
Published: 01 September 2018
... no question of marriage between his parents, of course, since his father was a white man of means and his mother was enslaved, but Douglass does make it clear that the presence on the plantation of mulatto offspring like him was “a constant offense” to white mistresses, who were forced to confront on...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2017) 28 (3): 67–92.
Published: 01 December 2017
... neorealist cinema. At the point in which this sequence occurs in Umberto D ., the young maid in question is pregnant, does not know for sure who the father is, but does know for sure that she will be fired as soon as her mistress finds out she is pregnant—and she has nowhere to go. From these premises, the...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2007) 18 (3): 7–42.
Published: 01 December 2007
... Street mansion as his housekeeper and mistress. Sally Bickham left Girard on cordial terms in 1796 to marry, and Girard quickly replaced her with Polly Kenton, a laundress. After many years as his mistress and housekeeper...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2006) 17 (1): 147–157.
Published: 01 May 2006
... determine their own life, not as wife, not as mother, not as mistress, not as girlfriend, but as individual human being. This will be a struggle permeated with bitter conflicts, torment, and suffering (mental and physical). Consider...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2002) 13 (3): 121–142.
Published: 01 December 2002
...!” said the carpenter. “Do you think nobody is to look black but yourself? Go tell your master I’m coming; and if you happen to see Mistress Alice, his daughter, give Matthew Maule’s humble regards to...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 1999) 11 (1): 1–37.
Published: 01 May 1999
... him. But this turn on his mistress is represented as an act of saving grace on the part of the horse, rescuing her from a melancholy future as wife and mother. differences...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2017) 28 (2): 86–115.
Published: 01 September 2017
...-Masoch’s Venus in Furs , Deleuze argues that masochism is defined by the pursuit of “supersensualism,” and not—as one might suppose—by a quest for unbounded sensuality. Severin, the novel’s protagonist, seeks to debase himself before a cold and exacting mistress whose whip would deliver him from the...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2017) 28 (3): 136–165.
Published: 01 December 2017
..., concubines, mistresses, courtesans, and wives. 1 He does not refer explicitly to exchanges of sex for money, but that only makes his obsession with the subject more intriguing, suggesting prostitution as a metaphor that pertains to economic exchange as such. Whether one writes of bakers or prostitutes...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2002) 13 (1): 1–13.
Published: 01 May 2002
... mistress, or the male lover of a married man, you too are standardly excluded so as not to increase the distress of the wife and children: is this not a social exclusion that you would find painfully acceptable? We also suffer greatly...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 2015) 26 (2): 70–85.
Published: 01 September 2015
..., of course, mothers, nurses, governesses, cooks, lovers, or wives, about whom obviously not a word could be wasted—unless, of course, they had a mistress, like Madame de Pompadour, with a certain political authority. I began the film by showing a group of people at the end of the first millennium...
Journal Article
differences (1 May 2005) 16 (1): 24–62.
Published: 01 May 2005
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2016) 27 (3): 20–44.
Published: 01 December 2016
... from the perspective of a whore” (85). 6 This question of the feminine likewise leads me to break with Benjamin’s conception of allegory in my readings of Duras and Wang. Their novels, written by women about “fallen” women (the femme adultère in Duras and the mistress in Wang), offer what...
Journal Article
differences (1 September 1999) 11 (2): 228–247.
Published: 01 September 1999
... engage in secretarial work, spend some time in foreign lands (Jamaica/China), and ponder their sexual status (as kept mistress/ go-go dancer). There is an aimless, episodic quality to both novels; they do not conclude so much as stop...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2014) 25 (3): 98–122.
Published: 01 December 2014
... further open out into a different register of kala ; even as Samaj actresses are celebrated for their roles as “unwed mothers,” “prostitutes,” and “mistresses” in Hindi and Marathi theater and cinema, it is their paid labor that guarantees the respectability and growth of the Samaj. In fact, almost every...
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2009) 20 (2-3): 36–53.
Published: 01 December 2009
Journal Article
differences (1 December 2003) 14 (3): 4–33.
Published: 01 December 2003