1-20 of 557 Search Results for

wisconsin

Sort by
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (1): 45–62.
Published: 01 February 1993
...Daniel R. Meyer Abstract This paper provides estimates of the effect of child support on exiting and reentering welfare for a sample of divorced women in Wisconsin. Modest amounts of child support do not have large effects on exiting welfare in this sample. The percentage of women who return...
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (2): 227–241.
Published: 01 May 1993
...Elizabeth Phillips; Irwin Garfinkel Abstract This study examines the changes over time in the personal incomes of nonresident fathers—whether divorced or nonmarital—in Wisconsin. Using data from the Wisconsin Court Record data base and the Wisconsin Department of Revenue, the authors examine...
Journal Article
Demography (1978) 15 (4): 477–485.
Published: 01 November 1978
... . Beverly Hills, Calif. : Sage Publications . Shannon , Lyle , Faine , J. R. , & McKim , J. L. ( 1974 ). The Ecological Distribution of Negroes in Racine, Wisconsin, 1960–1970 . Mimeo. Iowa City : Iowa Urban Community Research Center . Terhune , K. W. , & Kaufman...
Journal Article
Demography (1971) 8 (3): 297–305.
Published: 01 August 1971
...Harry Sharp; Leo F. Schnore Abstract The 1970 census included numerous procedural innovations, of which the most important was the use of mail-out/mail-back techniques. A statewide survey of Wisconsin households (conducted in May and June, 1970) included questions designed to elicit information...
Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (4): 1489–1516.
Published: 01 August 2022
... for children. We use individual-level data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine the enduring consequences of childhood exposure to local-area New Deal emergency employment work-relief activity. Our outcomes include adolescent cognition, educational attainment, midlife income, health behaviors, late...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Image
Published: 09 May 2014
Fig. 1 Child custody at divorce in Wisconsin, 1988–2008. a Includes a small number of cases from 1994 (12) and 1995 (1). b Includes a small number of cases from 1996 (22). c Includes a small number of cases from 2009 (20) and 2010 (2) More
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (2): 123–136.
Published: 01 May 1981
...Maurice M. MacDonald; Ronald R. Rindfuss Abstract The probability of first marriage for men who graduated from Wisconsin high schools in 1957 was analyzed with respect to their Social Security earnings records, Wisconsin income tax reports for parents, and other variables. The findings provide...
Journal Article
Demography (2010) 47 (Suppl 1): S111–S130.
Published: 01 March 2010
...Robert M. Hauser; David Weir Abstract We review recent developments in longitudinal studies of aging, focusing on the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Both studies are part of a trend toward biosocial surveys in which biological measurement is joined...
Journal Article
Demography (2009) 46 (1): 27–41.
Published: 01 February 2009
...Eric N. Reither; Robert M. Hauser; Karen C. Swallen Abstract Several important longitudinal studies in the social sciences have omitted biomarkers that are routinely recorded today, including height and weight. To account for this shortcoming in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS), an 11-point...
Journal Article
Demography (2009) 46 (2): 405–427.
Published: 01 May 2009
... level in Wisconsin. The findings indicate that this approach does not outperform the extrapolation projections. Although the regression methods produce more precise projections, the least biased projections are often generated by one of the extrapolation techniques. The performance of the knowledge...
Journal Article
Demography (1995) 32 (1): 81–96.
Published: 01 February 1995
...Elizabeth Thomson; Yvonne Brandreth Abstract We propose a multidimensional conceptualization of fertility demand and evaluate potential measures of each dimension, using data from a telephone survey of Wisconsin residents age 18-34. Most of the measures met tests for interval-level measurement; all...
Journal Article
Demography (1988) 25 (3): 317–335.
Published: 01 August 1988
... observation is terminated. These two problems are solved in estimating cohort wealth for a sample of Wisconsin taxpayers. Hazard rate models of differential occupational mortality risks were estimated from the occupational information on the tax records. Values of net estate are simulated for individuals...
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (4): 421–442.
Published: 01 November 1981
... of Sewell’s Wisconsin Model as its base. The results show that number of siblings is a negative influence on intervening variables affecting college plans. In general, the research documents the unfavorable consequences for individual siblings of high fertility, even in a country that is (at least for whites...
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (4): 511–528.
Published: 01 November 1981
...Susan G. Janssen; Robert M. Hauser Abstract Longitudinal data from a large .sample of Wisconsin men and women are used to examine the effects on fertility of religious and secular socialization, including farm upbringing. Analyses of children ever born (CEB) and of parity progression show...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (2): 295–308.
Published: 01 May 1972
... of the resulting eight-fold classification was taken as the dependent variable, and difference scores indicating main effects and first order interactions were obtained for each characteristic. The universe is the 375 incorporated places under 2500 in 1950outside the SMSAs of Wisconsin. Size of place was found...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (3): 389–399.
Published: 01 August 1979
...Wendy C. Wolf; Maurice M. MacDonald Abstract Focusing on the effects of men’s earnings, this paper analyzes remarriage. Previous empirical research has not established what theoretical aspects of men’s earnings are important. Here, data for Wisconsin high school graduates that include male...
Journal Article
Demography (2023) 60 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 February 2023
..., lifespan variability was lower among several states in the Northeast (e.g., Connecticut and Massachusetts), Upper Midwest (e.g., Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), and West (e.g., California, Oregon, Utah, and Washington). We observe a particularly worrisome trend of increasing lifespan variability...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1998) 35 (2): 147–157.
Published: 01 May 1998
... and the merits of alternative theories of marriage and divorce. We examine physical-custody outcomes among recent Wisconsin divorces in an effort to understand the factors associated with shared custody as well as mother-sole custody and father-sole custody. Although mother-sole custody remains the dominant...
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (4): 1381–1396.
Published: 09 May 2014
...Fig. 1 Child custody at divorce in Wisconsin, 1988–2008. a Includes a small number of cases from 1994 (12) and 1995 (1). b Includes a small number of cases from 1996 (22). c Includes a small number of cases from 2009 (20) and 2010 (2) ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (4): 1155–1176.
Published: 21 December 2012
...Erin Ruel; Robert M. Hauser Abstract To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial...
FIGURES