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Wage Regression

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Published: 26 October 2011
Fig. 1 Percentage change in the regression coefficient predicting log wages from number of children when each covariate is included separately More
Journal Article
Demography (2018) 55 (4): 1475–1485.
Published: 25 June 2018
... wages are imputed. This line of research supports estimating earnings regressions by excluding observations with imputed earnings in order to mitigate imputation match bias (Bollinger et al. 2015 ). Of relevance to immigrant wage convergence, Bollinger and Hirsch ( 2006 ) demonstrated substantial...
Journal Article
Demography (2001) 38 (3): 357–361.
Published: 01 August 2001
..., August 2001: 357 361 357 LONG-RUN CONVERGENCE OF ETHNIC SKILL DIFFERENTIALS, REVISITED* GEORGE J. BORJAS gression coefficient is 0.025 (standard error, s.e. = 0.018). The second coefficient comes from a regression of the mean log occupational wage of third-generation workers on the 1910 mean log wage...
Journal Article
Demography (2018) 55 (5): 1663–1680.
Published: 25 September 2018
...Rebecca Glauber Abstract Many studies have shown that women pay a wage penalty for motherhood, whereas men earn a wage premium for fatherhood. A few recent studies have used quantile regression to explore differences in the penalties across the wage distribution. The current study builds...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1997) 34 (2): 239–249.
Published: 01 May 1997
... comparison, however, the actual wage growth of immigrants relative to natives is similar to the predictions of cross-sectional regressions. This similarity suggests that either there is no cohort quality bias in the cross-sectional estimates of immigrant wage growth, or that there has been a coincidental...
Journal Article
Demography (2004) 41 (4): 721–738.
Published: 01 November 2004
... durations. 14 1 2011 © Population Association of America 2004 2004 Current Population Survey Return Migration Host Society Concrete Event Wage Regression References Alba R. , & Nee V. ( 2003 ). Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary...
Journal Article
Demography (1996) 33 (1): 82–97.
Published: 01 February 1996
... is correlated highly with the difference in their incomes. The results from regressions that included parental income, the child's predicted wage, the value of the exemption to parents, and the potential value .of the exemption to the child (based on the child's predicted wage) were highly unstable; thus we...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (2): 257–261.
Published: 01 May 1972
... and in-migration rates lower. Labor seems quite sensitive to differential labor market conditions and would appear to flow toward markets where an economic advantage lies. One interesting interpretation of the negative association between in-migration and wages is that employment opportunities may expand more...
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (3): 969–990.
Published: 21 March 2019
... of childbirths by 23 percentage points and the total number of childbirths by 1.3. Analyses of possible mechanisms show that labor market–related factors are a significant channel driving the negative effects; female college graduates are more likely to be wage earners and more likely to have high-wage...
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Published: 01 April 2021
Fig. 4 Education premiums (in weekly US$), by gender, wage percentiles, and period (based on quantile regressions) More
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (5): 1729–1750.
Published: 10 September 2015
... of Economics and Statistics, , 117–118, , 379 – 401 . 10.15609/annaeconstat2009.117-118.379 . Fortin , N. M. , & Lemieux , T. ( 1998 ). Rank regressions, wage distributions, and the gender gap . Journal of Human Resources, , 33, , 610 – 643 . 10.2307/146335 . Goldin , C...
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (3): 865–883.
Published: 15 April 2016
... who are overeducated for their occupation tend to receive lower wages than those employed in occupations commensurate with their education, and are also more dissatisfied with their jobs, overeducation may encourage men to emigrate. Results from the regression models, which account for differential...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (4): 1249–1274.
Published: 01 August 2021
... in a given occupation who work at least 40 hours per week. Our second indicator is the wage return to working longer hours in an occupation. To measure returns to longer hours, we follow a regression-based approach similar to that of Cortés and Pan (2019) and Goldin (2014) and estimate the slope...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2009) 46 (2): 341–369.
Published: 01 May 2009
... EVIDENCE In recent years, considerable efforts have been made to address the wage effect of mother- hood as well as its sources, typically using longitudinal data and panel regression modeling to account for unobserved heterogeneity bias in the analysis. Starting the surge of interest in the issue...
Journal Article
Demography (2009) 46 (3): 469–492.
Published: 01 August 2009
... not employed. There is not a well-established strategy for assigning wage offers to the jobless (Darity 1980). Therefore, we adopt three strategies to impute wages to the jobless: (1) a regression adjustment; (2) a regression adjustment that includes a 20% wage penalty for time out of the labor market; and (3...
Journal Article
Demography (2023) 60 (1): 201–226.
Published: 01 February 2023
... the differences in the wage consequences of mismatch between native and nonnative high-skilled workers. Because the wage regressions further controlled for broad occupation categories, we effectively examined the wage penalty of mismatch among mismatched college graduates of different nativity statuses who were...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (3): 339–356.
Published: 01 August 1976
... refers to number of years of marriage for the work experience tabulations (see text). Source: 1973 Philippines National Demographic Survey data tape. 344 DEMOGRAPHY, volume 13, number 3, August 1916 older groups (21-30 years of marriage). searchers in wage regressions applied to This pattern...
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (2): 233–246.
Published: 01 May 1999
... of observable and unob- servable ways. To the extent that these differences can be measured, selection is not a problem. Many important char- acteristics, however, are unobservable (such as motivation or attitudes toward risk-taking) and introduce the potential for selection bias into standard wage regressions...
Image
Published: 01 April 2021
Fig. 5 Education premiums (in weekly US$, left scale) and women's to men's education premium ratios (right scale), by year and wage percentile (based on quantile regressions) More
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (2): 449–470.
Published: 16 February 2016
... labor market experience with age and exclude education in the wage regressions used to generate both the end wage in each job and within-job earnings growth for individuals who have had more than one job. 1 Because information on the first wage is missing for about 25 % of the individuals...
Includes: Supplementary data