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Thirty Years' War

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Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (1): 111–135.
Published: 01 February 2021
... article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0). Mortality dynamics Differential mortality Holy Roman Empire Thirty Years' War When the first mortality improvements occurred and who benefited first from these gains are among the key questions that arise...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1977) 14 (4): 539–548.
Published: 01 November 1977
... can point to any parent cohort's life history and find some euphoric experi- ences in their younger years, or, alterna- tively, some great disaster, which left their mark. There are, admittedly, some over- riding calamities (the Thirty Years' War, the great smallpox epidemics of the late seventeenth...
Journal Article
Demography (1973) 10 (3): 301–314.
Published: 01 August 1973
... World War II. An estimated 25 to 29 percent of all women near 30 years old now have ended or will end their first marriage in divorce. About four-fifths of these divorced women have remarried or probably will do so. Of all women around 30 years old now, some five to ten percent may be expected...
Journal Article
Demography (1978) 15 (2): 177–182.
Published: 01 May 1978
... the past ten years, the United States has witnessed a dramatic rise in its aggregate divorce rate. After remaining relatively stable for over 40 years (except for two years in the Great Depression and a few years during World War II), the divorce rate began to rise precipitously in the latter half...
Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (1): 188–203.
Published: 01 March 1966
...(I)-1B, Tables 44 and 51; "Negro Population: March 1964," Current Popu- lation Reports (Series P-20, No. 142 [October 11, 1965 Table A. Recent Changes in Negro Fertility 189 tional attainment also occurred. Negroes reaching age 18 just after World War I had attained a median of 5 years of school- ing...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (3): 1171–1192.
Published: 09 June 2020
... and the 1700–1721 Great Northern War was followed by a growth in population for the rest of the eighteenth century. The Finnish experience of 1695–1721 thus mirrors the population dynamics that occurred after, for example, the Black Death or the Thirty YearsWar in Germany (e.g., Broadberry et al. 2015...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 399–413.
Published: 01 March 1965
... so that the effects of the Mexican War on male-female ratios were negligible. Between 1840 and 1860 the ratios of men to women in the ages from twenty to forty remained nearly constant, but the point at which men most greatly outnumbered women shifted from the thirties to the age group of the forties...
Journal Article
Demography (1974) 11 (4): 563–585.
Published: 01 November 1974
... SUBJECT TO STOCHASTIC DISTURBANCE We must now acknowledge the obvious fact that the net maternity rate is not completely determined endogenously by B, but also reflects exogenous factors such as climate, business cycles, war, and pure demographic randomness. We may formalize this indeterminancy by writing...
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (4): 533–549.
Published: 01 November 1993
... the logic they develop and use in their researches applies more widely than to human populations, there are some exceptions. Lotka saw a fleet of trucks as being subject to a mortality table, and during World War II the stock of engines needed to be stored in the South Pacific was calculated using a life...
Journal Article
Demography (1971) 8 (2): 247–259.
Published: 01 May 1971
... the proportion of 2-child families. Fertility Trends In Australia were remarriages and older marriages, which could be expected to be less fer- tile than the marriages of the young. When war started in 1939, there were many marriages at short notice followed by separation; fertility in the first year of marriage...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 657–672.
Published: 01 June 1967
... of fertility. In the second place, the analysis of fertility in the 1930's -a period in which fertility decline had not come yet to an end-provides a back- ground against which the post-war change can be usefully matched. Still, our analy- sis will concentrate on changes during the last fifteen years, a period...
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (4): 523–532.
Published: 01 November 1993
.... CHANGES IN THE DISCIPLINE OF DEMOGRAPHY Since the end of World War II, a number of changes have occurred that hold implications for the origin and nature of demographic research. We outline here what we believe to be the most important changes, referring back to this discussion as we present our Copyright...
Journal Article
Demography (1991) 28 (2): 201–211.
Published: 01 May 1991
.... During the post-World War II period, low incomes became concentrated increasingly among the growing number of single-parent families. Whereas most families had one earner in the late 1940s, Levy tells us, now a majority have two-but a growing number have none. In 1984, 44% of the families in the bottom...
Journal Article
Demography (1991) 28 (4): 513–533.
Published: 01 November 1991
...-to-year variability in Figure 2. These data show clearly that birth probabilities at various ages tend to move together (up or down) as one moves across years. Rindfuss et al. (1988, ChapA) were able to account for much of this change (until 1979) by a series of period factors such as World War II...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 745–756.
Published: 01 June 1968
... by the rapid fall in mortality after World War II would be for men and women to begin marrying at similar ages. In 1963, the last year for which data are available, the average age of men at marriage was approaching 29 and the gap in ages between men and women was still about 5 years." It is not known whether...
Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (1): 276–288.
Published: 01 March 1966
... trends are obvi- ously a consequence of the relatively high first-marriage rates between the end of World War II and 1960. In the older age range, the excess of married persons was about a million larger than the deficit of single persons for each sex; this fact is directly related to the fact...
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (2): 247–261.
Published: 01 May 1999
... of the Population Association of America, Washington, DC Evil Days: Thirty Years of War and Famine in Ethiopia . ( 1991 ). New York : Human Rights Watch . Kidane , A. ( 1989 ). Demographic Consequences of the 1984–1985 Ethiopian Famine . Demography , 26 , 515 – 22 . 10.2307/2061610 Kumar...
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (4): 671–678.
Published: 01 November 1975
... as an adaptation of these soci- eties to the reduction in mortality, we are at a total loss in explaining the sud- den interruption of this trend in the post- war years and its equally sudden resump- tion during the last ten years. The les- son must be that we do not understand the causal connections between...
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (2): 241–253.
Published: 01 May 1970
...- doubtedly results from lower fertility and/or higher infant and child mortality during the Second World War. Children born in 1942-1944 were ages 19 to 26 in the period 1964-1968, and there appear to be about 15,000 fewer women ages 20 to 24 in 1966 than would be the ease with a more smooth age curve...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 798–808.
Published: 01 June 1967
.... The large fluctuations reflect the impact of business cycles, war, and legislation on immigration. It is convenient to distin- guish four main periods of immigration. (1) The years 1901-14 were a period of massive immigration, with the number per year frequently exceeding one million and the total...