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Sibship size

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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 4 Changes in average sibship size and sibship size disadvantage in the years of education between the 1931–1940 cohort and the 1971–1980 cohort: in panel a, the blue fitted line is based on the whole country sample, and the red (dashed) fitted line is based on the country sample excluding More
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (3): 1035–1062.
Published: 22 June 2020
...Fig. 4 Changes in average sibship size and sibship size disadvantage in the years of education between the 1931–1940 cohort and the 1971–1980 cohort: in panel a, the blue fitted line is based on the whole country sample, and the red (dashed) fitted line is based on the country sample excluding...
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Includes: Supplementary data
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Published: 12 May 2016
Fig. 1 Multivariate sibship size/education pattern across the birth years: General Social Surveys, 1972–2010 More
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Published: 12 May 2016
Fig. 3 Association of sibship size and education by quintile of state spending on higher education for cohorts born in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s in the United States: General Social Surveys, 1972–2010, and U.S. Census of Governments More
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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 1 Cohort trends in average sibship size More
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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 2 Cohort trends in sibship size disadvantage in the years of education: whiskers show 95% confidence intervals of the coefficient. The scale of y -axis is widely different for Eastern Europe and East Asia due to Bulgaria and China. More
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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 3 Cohort trends in the correlation coefficient between sibship size and the years of education: correlations are semipartial correlations between sibship size net of gender, age, and survey effects and educational attainment. Whiskers show 95% confidence intervals of the coefficient More
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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 5 Economic growth, educational expansion and cohort changes in sibship size disadvantage in the years of education: the red dashed line shows the fitted line when East Asian countries are excluded. GDP per capita is are measured by the three-year averages around the beginning year (1960 More
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Published: 22 June 2020
Fig. 6 Trends in sibship size disadvantage in the years of education explained by parental education from the 1931–1940 cohort to 1971–1980 cohort. The scale of y -axis is different for Eastern Europe due to Bulgaria. More
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (3): 723–748.
Published: 12 May 2016
...Fig. 1 Multivariate sibship size/education pattern across the birth years: General Social Surveys, 1972–2010 ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (2003) 40 (3): 521–542.
Published: 01 August 2003
... financial behavior; saving; and, ultimately, adults’ wealth. I demonstrate that sibship size is associated with lower overall wealth in adulthood and that parents’ resources and education, respondent’s education, financial transfers, and financial behavior all mitigate the effect of siblings. Sibship size...
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (3): 903–931.
Published: 04 January 2013
... are not constrained by sibship size in choosing where to live: for families with more than one child, sibship size does not affect child-mother proximity. For aging parents, however, having fewer children reduces the probability of having at least one child living nearby, which is likely to have consequences...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (1): 35–55.
Published: 01 February 1975
.... These observations may be presented as frequencies in incomplete five-dimensional contingency tables. The five dimensions are: survival (living or dead), completed sibship size, birth order, type of family (according to completeness of information about family), and epoch (period in which the family lived...
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (1): 23–44.
Published: 28 December 2016
... as an instrumental variable, we estimate the effect of sibship size on adult fertility using high-quality data from Norwegian administrative registers. Our study sample is all firstborns or second-borns during the 1960s in Norwegian families with at least two children (approximately 110,000 men and 104,000 women...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (1): 207–228.
Published: 02 October 2012
... and sibship size in adulthood is reviewed. Female mortality appears to decline slightly with the number of surviving sisters, although this could be an artifact of severe recall errors in larger sibships or familial clustering of deaths. Under most circumstances, corrections for selection biases should have...
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Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (1): 281–313.
Published: 18 December 2014
... into account the simultaneity of fertility and schooling decisions. In contrast to most prior studies on sub-Saharan Africa, we find a net negative effect of sibship size on the level of schooling achieved by children—one that grows stronger as they progress through the educational system. 19 11 2014...
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Journal Article
Demography (2023) 60 (2): 539–562.
Published: 01 April 2023
... adulthood and a sibling's death in later life; the latter is explained by larger sibship size, indicating a greater lifetime risk of bereavement experiences. The higher risk of parental death during childhood for U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanic individuals is explained by covariates (e.g., lower levels...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1977) 14 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 August 1977
...Samuel H. Preston 30 12 2010 © Population Association of America 1977 1977 Family Size Total Fertility Rate Baby Boom Mortality Adjustment Sibship Size References Coale , Ansley J. , & Zelnick , M. ( 1963 ). New Estimates of Fertility and Population...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (6): 2085–2111.
Published: 29 October 2020
... of family size on child well-being in developing countries under the new fertility regime. In a low-fertility developing country context, it remains an empirical question whether an increase in sibship size (i.e., the number of siblings) reduces parental investment received by the existing child...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (5): 1895–1931.
Published: 27 September 2014
...) research has found that negative associations between sibship size and cognitive achievement are weaker among more widely spaced siblings than among closely spaced ones (Downey et al. 1999 ; Powell and Steelman 1990 ), it was suggested that comparing these estimates with those derived from the cross...
Includes: Supplementary data