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Recession

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Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (6): 2101–2123.
Published: 10 October 2017
... the U.S. Health and Retirement Study for 1992–2011 and multistate life tables to analyze working life expectancy at age 50 and study the impact of the Great Recession in 2007–2009. Despite declines of one to two years following the recession, in 2008–2011, American men aged 50 still spent 13 years, or two...
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Includes: Supplementary data
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Published: 01 June 2022
Fig. 1 Employment change in three recent recessions: 2001 recession, Great Recession, and COVID-19 recession (April and May 2020), by demographic characteristics. The sample consists of CPS respondents aged 18–65. For each bar, we compute the difference in the percentage of the demographic group More
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Published: 01 June 2022
Fig. 2 Employment change in three recent recessions: 2001 recession, Great Recession, and COVID-19 recession (April and May 2020), by marital and parental status interacted. See note in Figure 1 . More
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (1): 391–411.
Published: 13 January 2017
... of the Great Recession. Using data from the Current Population Survey, I investigate changes in public sector employment between 2003 and 2013. My results point to a post-recession double disadvantage for black public sector workers: they are concentrated in a shrinking sector of the economy, and they are more...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (5): 1867–1895.
Published: 01 October 2021
...Christopher R. Tamborini; Andrés Villarreal Abstract We examine immigrant men's employment stability during the Great Recession and its aftermath using a longitudinal approach that draws on data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), a nationally representative panel survey...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2018) 55 (5): 1727–1748.
Published: 06 August 2018
...Jacob W. Faber; Peter M. Rich Abstract Although subprime mortgage lending and unemployment were largely responsible for the wave of foreclosures during the Great Recession, additional sources of financial risk may have exacerbated the crisis. We hypothesize that many parents sending children...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (2): 471–505.
Published: 22 March 2016
...Daniel Schneider; Kristen Harknett; Sara McLanahan Abstract In the United States, the Great Recession was marked by severe negative shocks to labor market conditions. In this study, we combine longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (2011) 48 (3): 1049–1058.
Published: 09 July 2011
...Michael S. Rendall; Peter Brownell; Sarah Kups Abstract Researchers in the United States and Mexico have variously asserted that return migration from the United States to Mexico increased substantially, remained unchanged, or declined slightly in response to the 2008–2009 U.S. recession and fall...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (6): 1893–1915.
Published: 08 October 2015
... the events of the Great Recession, leveraging variation in the severity of the crisis between years and across states, to examine how exposure to worse state-level economic conditions is related to poor women’s likelihood of marriage and of having a nonmarital birth between 2008 and 2012. In accord...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (6): 2203–2228.
Published: 19 November 2014
... are also consistent with an economic explanation for the decline in international migration. The largest declines in migration occurred precisely among the demographic groups most affected by the Great Recession: namely, economically active young men with low education. Results from the statistical...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (2): 631–654.
Published: 01 April 2021
...Massimo Anelli; Nicoletta Balbo Abstract How does emigration affect fertility in the country of origin? We address this question by estimating counterfactual fertility during the Great Recession in order to understand what the effect of the recession on fertility would be in the absence...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (4): 1463–1493.
Published: 18 June 2019
... during post-recessional recovery periods (Abel and Deitz 2012 ). For instance, Jaimovich and Siu ( 2012 ), examining rebounds in job loss across occupational categories after every economic recession in the United States since the 1970s, found that an overwhelming proportion of permanent job loss...
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Includes: Supplementary data
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Published: 13 October 2020
Fig. 1 HRS cohorts’ exposures to economic recessions and market bubbles during their 30s, 1970–2010. a Volatility in financial markets as well as in the housing market during 2000–2001. Sources: Curry and Shibut ( 2000 ); National Bureau of Economic Research ( 2020 ); Odekon ( 2015 ). More
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Published: 08 October 2018
Fig. 1 Interstate residential migration rates. Shaded areas denote recessions as determined by the National Bureau of Economic Research. Authors’ tabulations using the Current Population Survey (CPS), American Community Survey (ACS), and Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) microdata More
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Published: 08 October 2018
Fig. 4 Employer-to-employer transition rates. Shaded areas denote recessions as determined by the National Bureau of Economic Research. Quarterly data are seasonally adjusted. CPS monthly data are converted to quarterly via addition following Hyatt and Spletzer ( 2013 ). The second and third More
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Published: 19 September 2012
Fig. 3 Average annual parental work hours, 1967–2009. Shaded bars are recessions as defined by the NBER. Source: March Current Population Survey, 1967–2009 More
Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (3): 827–855.
Published: 01 June 2022
...Fig. 1 Employment change in three recent recessions: 2001 recession, Great Recession, and COVID-19 recession (April and May 2020), by demographic characteristics. The sample consists of CPS respondents aged 18–65. For each bar, we compute the difference in the percentage of the demographic group...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2008) 45 (2): 323–343.
Published: 01 May 2008
...José A. Tapia granados Abstract Recent research has shown that after long-term declining trends are excluded, mortality rates in industrial countries tend to rise in economic expansions and fall in economic recessions. In the present work, co-movements between economic fluctuations and mortality...
Journal Article
Demography (1998) 35 (2): 243–250.
Published: 01 May 1998
..., we examine whether father’ availability and the couple’s economic resources are differentially related to child care by fathers over time. We focus on the differences between 1991—a recession year—and 1988 and 1993—two nonrecession years. Increased availability of fathers is significantly related...
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Published: 01 August 2022
Fig. 1 Unemployment rates by race for the working population aged 16–85, January 2000–May 2020. The gray shading indicates the early 2000s recession, the Great Recession, and the COVID-19 crisis. Source : FRED (Federal Reserve Economic Data). More