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Percent Migration

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Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (2): 352–377.
Published: 01 June 1966
... “motivated” movement to Santiago, and other aspects oj the migratory move itself were also topics of inquiry. Tabulations of this survey portray Santiago as a city of great in-migration. The flow is estimated to be between 1.5 and 1.7 percent per year. Among the population 15 years of age or over, about 50...
Journal Article
Demography (1973) 10 (2): 259–275.
Published: 01 May 1973
... variables. The three independent variables in Zipf’s hypothesis accounted for 57 percent of the variation in interstate migration streams in 1935–1940, 61 percent in 1949–1950, and 68 percent in 1955–1960. The addition of per capita personal income of the states of origin and of destination increased...
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (4): 435–443.
Published: 01 November 1976
... to nonmetropolitan areas, in contrast to net out-migration of 350,000 persons from these areas in 1965–1970. Reversal was caused by a 12 percent decrease in the number of nonmetropolitan out-migrants and a 23 percent increase in the number of SMSA residents moving to nonmetropolitan territory over 1965–1970 levels...
Journal Article
Demography (1974) 11 (1): 1–23.
Published: 01 February 1974
... mainly by the uncer- tainty pertaining to the international migration component. The population under 35 comprised about 58 percent of the total population in 1970. The esti- mates for ages over 35 are subject to greater error, since they are based on symptomatic data and relatively in- direct methods...
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (3): 299–311.
Published: 01 August 1983
.... About 25 percent of residential mobility and 40 percent of migration occurred under conditions of substantial constraint. Mobility was most often constrained by family dynamics; for migration, occupational relocations frequently imposed the decision-to-move process and determined destinations...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 809–819.
Published: 01 June 1967
.... First, the data show that the Japanese-American population has increased in all regions of the nation, especially in the representative West (from 71 percent in 1950 to 82 percent in 1960). Second, educational attainment, which was about equal to that of whites in 1950, was better for males...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (4): 655–664.
Published: 01 November 1972
... tended to have higher migration efficiency than whites. Rapidly growing metropolitan areas had higher migration efficiency ratios than areas growing at a lower rate or losing population. The educational level of a metropolitan area, as measured by the percent of the population 25 years old or over...
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (4): 601–614.
Published: 01 November 1975
...Larry H. Long; Kristin A. Hansen Abstract The rate of return migration to the South rose by nearly 19 percent between the late 1950’s and the late 1960’s and was an important factor in changing the South’s overall migration pattern. But an increase in the rate of return migration was somewhat less...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 363–373.
Published: 01 March 1967
...) and the percent in the secondary sector is low and positive. In 1960, however, the association is negative (suggesting a possible change in the direction of the association), but city growth rates and the proportion of females married are more closely related to fertility than percent in the secondary sector...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (2): 257–277.
Published: 01 May 1979
... these into two cate- Female Migration in Chile 259 Table I.-Women 15 Years of Age and Over: Residence in 1970 by Migrant Type (Chile 1970) Residence in 1970 Other Total Chile Urban urban Rural Migrant type N Percent Santiago areas areas Total 130,129 100.0 36.7 43.3 20.0 Non-migrant 83,318 100.0 30.6 44.0 25.4...
Journal Article
Demography (1974) 11 (1): 143–148.
Published: 01 February 1974
...Vernon Renshaw Abstract A study by Donald Pursell (1972), which examines migration data compiled from the one-percent sample file of the Social Security Administration, is discussed in this paper. An important feature of the data which is neglected by Pursell is pointed out, and the Pursell results...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 249–267.
Published: 01 March 1968
.... retrospective five-year intrametropoHtan mobility rate for the population aged 5 years and over was 38.2 percent, as con- trasted with 30.0 percent for all United States SMSA's with more than one mil- lion population." Comparable SMSA in- migration rateswere 19.1 and 17.0 percent, respectively." The level...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 143–157.
Published: 01 March 1967
..., the question is raised whether Brazil’s rate of economic development during the postwar period up to 1960 can be maintained, let alone increased, in the face of a population growth rate which will probably average 3.2–3.5 percent for the period 1960–70 and which, in the absence of a decline in fertility...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 532–552.
Published: 01 June 1967
... is overtaking the rest of the nation is indexed by comparing the 40 percent increase in value added by manu- facture in the region to the 18 percent increase added in the nation as a whole during the years 1945-59. Besides a plentiful supply of labor, the Migration in the Southeast 533 region offers many...
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (2): 235–248.
Published: 01 May 1983
...-1980 indicates that this technique is superior to the commonly used plus-minus adjustment to historical rates. 13 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1983 1983 Migration Rate Rank Pattern Military Population Percent Migration Retirement Migration References...
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (1): 85–101.
Published: 01 February 1981
... sample are repeat moves, not primary. At least 71 percent of them were made by persons who had moved at least once (and are, therefore, candidates for return migration). Because we cannot observe locations between ori- gin and 1968, some of the 320 primary moves undoubtedly would have been classified...
Journal Article
Demography (1974) 11 (3): 509–520.
Published: 01 August 1974
... came from outside Fars Province, and the remaining 11 percent migrated from villages in Fars Ostan. It is inter- esting to note at this point that in gen- eral rural migrants have moved shorter distances than urban migrants. Finally, 511 the age compositions of the three groups were not greatly...
Journal Article
Demography (1964) 1 (1): 227–241.
Published: 01 March 1964
... Estimates for States and Local Areas 239 Method II is somewhat surprising since we expected Method II to overestimate the population of fast- growing suburban areas. Apparently, in spite of very high estimated school-age migration rates- some running as high as 100 percent- migration rates of families...
Journal Article
Demography (1980) 17 (2): 145–158.
Published: 01 May 1980
... in the United States . Santa Monica, California : The Rand Corporation . Morrison P. A. ( 1971 ). Chronic Movers and the Future Redistribution of Population . Demography , 8 , 171 – 184 . 10.2307/2060607 Morrison, P. A. 1976. Studying Return Migration with the Social Security One-Percent...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 310–330.
Published: 01 March 1967
... 0.106, -0.070 0.106, _0.066 0.104, _0.060 20 and 40 percent 0.094, -0.070 0.094, -0.066 0.092, .0.060 o and 20 percent 0.082, .0.070 0.082, .0.066 0.080, _0.060 _10 and o percent 0.070, -0.070 0.070, -0.066 0.068, .0.060 a The ratio is the estimated net migration divided by the enumerated first_census...