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Percent Figure

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Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 126–134.
Published: 01 March 1967
..., the difference narrowed down considerably; and, while the widow remarriage percentage was 34.2 in Saharanpur. it was found to be 334 in Rohtak and 31.1 in Mathura. A 3 percent lower figure for Mathura district could be a result of the Brahminic influence. Widow remarriages were found to be very common among...
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (3): 287–299.
Published: 01 August 1970
.... In the state, excluding Philadelphia, about 3 out of 4 mixed marriages involve nonwhite males; in Philadelphia, the figure is 52 percent. To some extent nonresidents seem to be attracted to Philadelphia for their intermarriages; but, on the other hand, a considerable number of the 84 percent who are residents...
Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (2): 332–342.
Published: 01 June 1966
... estimated, using life table methods, to be between 55 and 75 percent at one year; the smaller figure was obtained when theIUD was considered to be in situ only until the last examination, when it was observed to be in place. The latter or larger figure was obtained when the IUD was considered to be in situ...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (1): 51–68.
Published: 01 February 1972
... the medium series in a set. One may reason- ably compare each projection in a set of such projections with the figure actually recorded to indicate how it deviates from the current figure. Such comparisons, ex- pressed in terms of percent differences, have, in fact, often been made. Most of the systematic...
Journal Article
Demography (1988) 25 (4): 641–645.
Published: 01 November 1988
...Saul D. Hoffman; Greg J. Duncan 12 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1988 1988 Family Size Capita Income Income Change Percent Figure Precipitous Decline References Duncan , G. J. , & Holfman , S. D. ( 1985 ). A reconsideration...
Journal Article
Demography (1984) 21 (3): 347–360.
Published: 01 August 1984
.... Nevertheless, this figure is rather an arbitrary one, and we have decided to use a range of estimates be- tween 3 and 5 percent as nonpublished rates in our illustrative computations. AN APPLICATION Since estimates of the factors included in the equation have been completed, they can be applied to the equation...
Journal Article
Demography (1976) 13 (3): 397–409.
Published: 01 August 1976
... 86,080 U.8 83,710 97,705 14.3 45,926 54,108 15.1 37,784 43,597 13.3 83,524 95,549 12.6 45,361 53,066 14.5 38,163 42,483 10.2 a- Sample count. b- Minus sign denotes net overcount. Base of percent is the estimated population. comparison between the census figure and an estimate prepared with data from...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 362–373.
Published: 01 March 1968
... (a) Preliminary data based on a 0.1 percent sample of persons. Preliminary data were released in 1951, final data in 1952_1953; 368 DEMOGRAPHY very close to the final figures. It is difficult to conceive of any inference about the social or economic situation which one might be led to by the final figures...
Journal Article
Demography (1988) 25 (4): 497–508.
Published: 01 November 1988
... procedures to calculate cumulative experience with cohabitation. Estimates using these procedures indicate that in the absence of marriage, the cohabitation rates of Figure 1 would result in 36 percent of the women, compared with 34 percent of the men, exiting single life through cohabitation by 23Vz years...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 679–689.
Published: 01 June 1968
...: A = percent knowing the term "family planning" B = percent knOWing at least one method C = percent protected by all contraception and all sterility D = percent currently using contraception or used in past E '= percent currently using some contraception F = percent current 1)' wearing the rUeD Figure I...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (3): 339–358.
Published: 01 August 1979
...- between 61 and 84 percent of those women limited their fertility. Figures are also provided on lower bounds on the proportion of ever-married white women born in the late eighteenth and early nine- teenth centuries who limited their fertility. For example, at least 16percent and prob- ably around 25...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (4): 569–587.
Published: 01 November 1972
... of sterility and, using the proportions "Definitely Sterile" and "Probably Sterile" from the 1960 Growth of American Families Study, he reached a figure of 13 percent sterile to apply to the poor and near-poor women (Campbell, 1968, p. 240). The applica- tion of this percentage yielded a deduc- tion of 1.067...
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (1): 99–109.
Published: 01 February 1983
... males and females in the 1980 Mexican Census of about 3.5 percent, with males less likely to be enumerated, a figure that falls squarely within our test range. While some ob- servers might think this value slightly low in the case of Mexico, it has been suggested that internal migration of fe- males...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 820–837.
Published: 01 June 1967
... registration. Thus, for instance, the percentage of births delivered in hospitals in 1940 was 59.9 percent for whites and 26.7 percent for nonwhites. The corre- sponding figures for 1950 are 92.8 and 57.9 percent, and for 1960, 98.8 and 85.0 percent. The percent figures for illegiti- mate births out of total...
Journal Article
Demography (1985) 22 (2): 185–198.
Published: 01 May 1985
... months for 25 percent of the mothers to have a second birth, 30 months for 50 percent to have a second birth and nearly four years before three-fourths had a second birth. For all blacks, the respective figures are 16, 27 and 57 months. These figures indicate a slower pace than we observed for first...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 293–309.
Published: 01 March 1967
... and Technical Manpower Resources, NSF 64-28 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1964), pp. 7-14. Mathematicians in- creased by 348 percent, electrical and electronic technicians by 680 percent. Figures are from United States Bureau of the Census, United States Census of Population, 1980: Detailed...
Journal Article
Demography (1985) 22 (4): 515–544.
Published: 01 November 1985
... ' : . , ' ' ", "" " .1 0 ., I" - I , . "' .. .9 .6 Whites " . Blacks '. " Hispanics ., '. .5 .4 14.0 15.0 16.0 17.0 18.0 19.0 20.0 21.0 22.0 AGE IN YEARS 1.°r1 -. 5 .8 o z Cii zQ .7 ~ ~g: Figure I.-Entry into marriage by females ages 14-22 by race-ethnicity [Kaplan-Meier estimates with 95 percent confidence bands...
Journal Article
Demography (1985) 22 (2): 289–308.
Published: 01 May 1985
... years the proportion rollment figures through the inclusion of dropping out of primary school has adults and adolescents in the primary been very small. school enrollment totals, we restrict the 4. Matriculation is never 100 percent school enrollment data we use to pri- complete, so that school enroll...
Journal Article
Demography (1973) 10 (3): 301–314.
Published: 01 August 1973
.... For the period since 1930, this may be seen from the rather complex detail shown in Figure 2, which was plotted from Table C, T. S. Bureau of the Cen- sus (1972). The figure presents data for birth cohorts of women in terms of the cumulative percent ever married through successive five-year periods that ended...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 745–756.
Published: 01 June 1968
..., was calculated from a population estimate based on the 1953 Census. All crude birth rates after 1963 are provisional figures. Table 2.-AGE-SPECIFIC BIRTH RATES, GENERAL FERTILITY RATES, AND PERCENT CHANGE, CEYLON, 1953 AND 1963 Age specific birth rates PercentAge change 1953 (a) 1963 (a) General fertility rates...