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Parity Progression

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Journal Article
Demography (2010) 47 (1): 97–124.
Published: 01 February 2010
...) trends in the total fertility rate and its components. For the methodology to be applicable, the total fertility rate (TFR) must be calculated from parity progression ratios (PPRs). The components of the TFR are PPRs, the total marital fertility rate (TMFR), and the TFR itself as measures of the quantum...
Journal Article
Demography (1991) 28 (3): 467–479.
Published: 01 August 1991
...Griffith Feeney Abstract Taiwan’s decline in fertility is studied by using period parity progression ratios. Levels of marriage and motherhood are found to have been high and essentially constant though the late 1980s, suggesting that the decline has been due almost entirely to declines in second...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (3): 377–388.
Published: 01 August 1979
...Gary H. McClelland Abstract The two methods commonly used to assess the effect of sex preferences on fertility are inadequate to the task. Parity progression ratio analyses suffer from logical problems stemming from the heterogeneity of sex preferences and the riskiness of fertility decisions...
Journal Article
Demography (1979) 16 (3): 481–484.
Published: 01 August 1979
...Lester R. Curtin; I. Joel Frockt; Gary G. Koch Abstract Contingency table modeling procedures are proposed to examine the effects of independent variables on parity progression ratios. The methodology is outlined and an incremental-factorial linear model is developed. 30 12 2010 ©...
Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 414–428.
Published: 01 March 1965
... Memorial Fund, 1963. A book by Pascal K. Whelpton, Arthur A. Campbell, and John E. Patterson is in preparation which analyzes the results of the “Growth of American Families” survey of 1960. 5 For discussions of the parity progression method, see the following: P-25, No. 286, pp. 35–37; Guy H. Orcutt...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (4): 1147–1166.
Published: 04 August 2015
... of the transition to parenthood is an important determinant of further fertility. Analyzing longitudinal data from Germany, we find that the experience during the transition to parenthood, as measured by changes in subjective well-being, predicts further parity progression. A drop in well-being surrounding first...
FIGURES
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 2 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with no education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 3 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with 1–7 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 4 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 1–7 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 5 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for rural women with 8–11 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 6 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 8–11 years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 01 February 2022
Fig. 7 Percentile birth interval durations, sex ratios, and parity progression for urban women with 12 or more years of education, by spell, sex composition, and period. The horizontal solid line indicates the natural sex ratio of 51.2% boys. Source: NFHS. More
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Published: 04 August 2015
Fig. 1 Estimated parity progression by drop in well-being at first birth, net of other factors. Estimated from Model 4 in Table  2 with other covariates held at their mean levels More
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Published: 21 December 2012
Fig. 1 Comparison of parity progression ratios (PPRs) derived alternatively by the birth history, P it , and P ait methods: Philippines 2003 DHS, whole country. In Figs. 1, 2 , 3 , and 4 , in the case of cohort estimates, the open-ended parity transition is 13+ to 14+ for the P More
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Published: 01 June 2021
Fig. 1 Effects of grandparental death on probability of parity progression, by parity and pooled across parities. Source: Table 4 . *** p  < .001 More
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Published: 01 June 2021
Fig. 2 Effects of grandparental death on probability of parity progression, by age of youngest child. Source: Table 5 . ‡ Interaction effect between age of youngest child and any grandparental death is significant at p  < .001. *** p  < .001 More
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Published: 01 June 2021
Fig. 3 Effects of grandparental death on probability of parity progression, by residential proximity to adult child prior to death. Source: Table 6 . # Interaction effect between residential proximity and any grandparental death is significant at p  < .05. *** p < .001 More
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Published: 22 January 2020
Fig. 4 Relationship between higher-order and lower-order parity progression in 83 countries More
Journal Article
Demography (1992) 29 (2): 227–245.
Published: 01 May 1992
... to estimate the distributions and means of ages at first and last births, birth intervals, and parity progression ratios from age- and parity-specific fertility rates available from vital statistics data. Results show that the cohorts increased and decreased their age at first birth, birth intervals...
Journal Article
Demography (2006) 43 (3): 553–568.
Published: 01 August 2006
... life course under the specified pattern of transfer rates. The two living state case and hierarchical multistate models with any number of living states are analyzed in detail. Applying our approach to 1997 U.S. fertility data, we find that observed rates of parity progression are roughly proportional...