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Oral Method

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Journal Article
Demography (1969) 6 (3): 335–346.
Published: 01 August 1969
... impression favoring the oral even when statistical evidence, as presented here, favors the intrauterine method. 30 12 2010 © Population Association of America 1969 1969 Family Planning Program Continuation Rate Baltimore City Johns Hopkins School Oral Method References Baker...
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (5): 1399–1428.
Published: 13 September 2016
... more likely to use less effective methods for pregnancy prevention (e.g., condoms) than white women, who tended to use more effective methods (e.g., oral contraceptives). And although the most effective method for pregnancy prevention—long-acting reversible contraception (LARC)—was used more often...
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Published: 01 December 2021
) of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Data were provided for the copper IUD, the oral pill (both the combined estrogen and progestin pill as well as the progestin-only pill), injectable contraceptives, and condoms (requested by women or men). Trends displayed are for the total population covered by each method More
Journal Article
Demography (1971) 8 (3): 335–339.
Published: 01 August 1971
... Family Planning Family Planning Program Continuation Rate Oral Contracep Decay Form References Christ Carl F. ( 1966 ). Econometric Models and Methods . New York : John Wiley and Sons, Inc . Hall Ms-Franeoise , & Reinke William A ( 1969 ). Factors influencing...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 433–438.
Published: 01 March 1968
... 2011 © Population Association of America 1968 1968 Family Planning Menstrual Cycle Oral Contraceptive Pregnancy Rate High Failure Rate RHYTHM: A HAZARDOUS CONTRACEPTIVE METHOD MARIO JARAMILLO-GOMEZ AND JUAN B. LONDONo· RESUMEN Se presentan los resultados obtenidos por los diez...
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (1): 31–41.
Published: 01 February 1970
... . . 14.5 14.2 9.9 6.9 9.8 5.2 10.0 important as use levels appear to sta- bilize below thirty percent. As will be shown below, satisfaction with other methods and a high rate of sterility pre- clude any major upward shift in the percentage of these older women using orals. Furthermore, if data in Tables 3...
Journal Article
Demography (1964) 1 (1): 106–110.
Published: 01 March 1964
.... When health workers talked on family planning to the villagers, there was no systematic opposition. They liked the idea of small family size and desired a simple method, especially an oral pill. It was felt that the older methods cannot qualify for uni- versal acceptance of the poor and ig- norant...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 941–946.
Published: 01 June 1968
... without a doctor's prescription. Perhaps it would be useful to consider Table l.-COMMERCIAL SALES OF CONTRACEPTIVES IN DE- VELOPING COUNTRIES, EXCLUSIVE OF GOVERNMENT FAMIIN PLANNING PROGRAM USE OR SUPPLIES FROM ASSISTING GOVERNMENTS Number of users contraceptive methods 1960 1965 1968 Oral contraceptives...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 960–972.
Published: 01 June 1968
... the action program varied from 2 percent for the IUCD to 82 per- cent for ligation. The proportion who were informed about how to use a method varied from 2 percent for the IUCD and oral tablets to 28 percent for ligation and the Ota ring. The proportion who had tried a method varied from virtually none...
Journal Article
Demography (1997) 34 (4): 513–523.
Published: 01 November 1997
... nonsurgical method (i.e., condom, oral contraceptive, contraceptive foam, IUD, contraceptive injection), or (4) modem surgical method; M is method; V . is the indirect utility individual i receives fr~m method m7'XM. is the set of household char- acteristics affecting the couple's preferences regarding util...
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (4): 459–465.
Published: 01 November 1970
...- ticular table will apply to populations other than the one for which the table was developed. We know that there are large differences between populations in the attrition experienced with similar contraeeptive methods. In Taiwan for example, oral discontinuation rates are reported to be very high...
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (1): 273–294.
Published: 01 February 2021
.... The main outcome variables of interest are rates of contraceptive use and the incidence of STIs. We restrict the analysis to contraceptives that are close substitutes for ECPs, such as condoms, regular oral contraceptives, the withdrawal method, and the rhythm or abstinence method. We do not compare any...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 590–597.
Published: 01 June 1968
... government spent millions of pounds III buying oral contraceptiv~s, and. one-half the market price of the pills, paid by the clients, formed the compensation of work- ers in the centers. These efforts on the part of the government contributed to the low budget of the program. By February, 1966, 1,991 centers...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 388–396.
Published: 01 March 1967
... F. ( 1966 ). Use of Oral Contraceptives in the United States . Science , CLIII , 1199 – 1205 . 10.1126/science.153.3741.1199 16 Charles F. Westoff and Norman Ryder, “Methods of Fertility Control Used in the United States, 1955–65” (to be published in the Proceedings of the Fifth Notre...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 699–701.
Published: 01 June 1968
..., repeated ex- pulsions and pregnancies with IUCD in situ, became so large that it was obvious that an alternative method was needed for women forced to abandon the IUCD. At this time, oral pills were available on the local market, but at prices so high as to make it financially impossible for the poorer...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 576–600.
Published: 01 June 1967
... about other methods IS much less widespread. The douche and orals account for 6 percent and 5 percent, respectively, of all reports. Lactation, safe period, withdrawal, sterilization of fe- males, and abstinence account for between 4 percent and 3 percent. Least known are the IUeD, the pessary...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 931–940.
Published: 01 June 1968
... of an IUCD; prescription, continuing use, or discontinuation of oral or traditional methods; pregnancy under unknown circumstances; and sus- pected, but unconfirmed pregnancy. Each SLC group is further distributed by time elapsed between first acceptance and last contact. Women whose follow-up...
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 627–631.
Published: 01 June 1968
... was designated the method of choice. The Lippes loop has been used exclusively. Concern about acceptance, ease of utilization and safety of other methods has limited their initial use. Oral contraceptives and condoms are both commercially available, but with few exceptions are not distributed through the public...
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (5): 1739–1764.
Published: 03 May 2013
... permanent methods of contraception (tubectomy and vasectomy for their husbands) and are more likely to use nonpermanent methods (condoms, oral contraceptives, or traditional methods (mostly periodic abstinence and withdrawal)) that have higher failure rates (Khan and Rahman 1997 ). Hence, educated women...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (2): 632–641.
Published: 01 June 1968
... it im_ possible to determine how many methods t hey knew.) Table 6.-METHODS OF FERTILITY COKTROL KNOWN AND AVERAGE AGE OF THOSE WHO KNOW EACH METHOD, AdONG EVER-MARRIED WOMEN AGE 15-49, IN KENYA, 1966 Contracepttve method Female sterilization .. Oral pilL . Abort ion . IUCD "Inject i on" . Rhythm . Vogue...