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Omission Error

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Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (4): 1345–1355.
Published: 25 June 2015
... States are not counted as a result of these two sources of error. Misreporting is the larger source of error, accounting for more than one-third of all migrants. Those who are not counted, especially whole-household migrants, are a unique group. Their omission results in an underestimate of female...
Journal Article
Demography (1990) 27 (2): 285–302.
Published: 01 May 1990
...David J. Fein Abstract This article assesses differences in rates of omission across seven race-ethnicity groups in the 1980 census to learn more about the social factors that condition census enumeration. Findings indicate that there are multiple sources of error, that these sources reflect...
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (2): 387–411.
Published: 04 February 2014
..., Peter, and James are “matches” (represented by the unidirectional arrows), Mary is a potential “addition,” and John and Julie are potential “omissions.” The age of Paul is misreported during SSH (35 vs. 32, “age error”), whereas the age of Peter is correctly reported. James’ age at death is misreported...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (1): 21–34.
Published: 01 February 1975
... Association of America 1975 1975 Infant Mortality Infant Death Omission Error Urban Rate Mortality Schedule References Bourgeois-Pichat J. ( 1952 ). An Analysis of Infant Mortality Population Bulletin of the United Nations (pp. 1 – 14 ). New York : United Nations . Brass...
Image
Published: 04 February 2014
Fig. 3 Proportions of deaths omitted from SSH by date of death (time between death and survey) (panel a, top) and by age at death (panel b, lower) ( n = 308). Error bars represent 95 % confidence intervals; the difference in the probability of omission by age at death was significant at the p More
Image
Published: 10 September 2020
Fig. 1 An example of reporting errors in full birth history data . DOB = date of birth. AAD = age at death. In this example, baby 1 and baby 2 were affected by date displacement. Baby 3 was affected by age overstatement, whereas baby 4 was an omission. More
Image
Published: 04 February 2014
.” The age of Paul is misreported during SSH (35 vs. 32, “age error”), whereas the age of Peter is correctly reported. James’ age at death is misreported during SSH (27 vs. 24, “age error”) as is his date of death (2001 vs. 2004, “date error”). This latter date error leads James’ death to be misclassified More
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (5): 1705–1726.
Published: 10 September 2020
...Fig. 1 An example of reporting errors in full birth history data . DOB = date of birth. AAD = age at death. In this example, baby 1 and baby 2 were affected by date displacement. Baby 3 was affected by age overstatement, whereas baby 4 was an omission. ...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (1): 121–134.
Published: 01 February 1999
... information about error-making, the types of errors did not differ significantly by type of form. First, form errors were errors that we could detect sim- ply by looking at the form: omissions, failing to skip when directed to do so, and putting correct answers in the wrong place. Form errors composed just...
Image
Published: 10 September 2020
Fig. 4 Sources of error in FBH data. Date displacement refers to events reported to have occurred earlier/later than recorded by the HDSS, leading to erroneous exclusion/inclusion from the reference period. Age understatement refers to errors resulting from the fact that a respondent More
Journal Article
Demography (1966) 3 (1): 218–237.
Published: 01 March 1966
..., it eliminates the error caused by the un- derenumeration common to all age groups. 1 Peru, Censo Nacional de Poblaci6n y Ocu- pacion: Resultados Generales (Lima: Miniaterio de Further, by considering only the age Hacienda y Comercio, Direccion Nacional de groups ranging from 10 to 59 years, the Eatadlstdca...
Journal Article
Demography (1987) 24 (2): 271–278.
Published: 01 May 1987
... of the births, even though confined to those that occurred during the previous two years, can be reported differently by different respondents. The errors of omission and time allocation may also operate differently for the two types of respondents; only in a fairly literate population or a population...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 688–709.
Published: 01 June 1967
..., baptismal certificates, and delivery certificates for those born in maternity wards) are but a few of the measures used to minimize the errors in birth reporting. However, the unique fea- ture of this survey was the extensive use of information taken from the birth regis- ters to cross-check the information...
Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 289–301.
Published: 01 March 1965
... in most of the underdeveloped countries because of a lack of adequate statistical information. In most develop- ing nations the registration of births and deaths is incomplete; even the population censuses quite frequently display short- comings. Errors due to omissions affecting vital statistics tend...
Journal Article
Demography (1998) 35 (1): 1–21.
Published: 01 February 1998
... estimates are less consistent with an his- torical series prepared by Coale and Rives (1973). Census counts for African Americans during the twentieth century have been flawed by high rates of omission and of age misreporting (Coale and Rives 1973; Robinson et al. 1993). Errors in the census add uncertainty...
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (2): 213–226.
Published: 01 May 1983
... described above. Age Misstatement and Differential Omission of Children An important source of error in indi- rect estimation of developing countries is age misstatement and differential omis- sion from censuses by age. The present method is also vulnerable to these prob- lems. But once again they appear...
Journal Article
Demography (1984) 21 (1): 1–8.
Published: 01 February 1984
... that the quality of the fertility data from the 1971 Supplementary Enquiry is good. The measure of fertility (the dependent variable) used is the number of children ever born to currently married females. Retrospective data are subject to distor- tions (see Brass, 1975, p. 56). To circum- vent omission errors due...
Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 630–639.
Published: 01 March 1965
... previously cited," to the effect that higher levels of underregistration of deaths in the early years would lead to an indicated higher level of completeness of enumera- tion in 1930 as compared to 1940, is either in error or indicative of a major omission in the authors' exposition." The authors add...
Journal Article
Demography (1986) 23 (1): 53–66.
Published: 01 February 1986
... cohort effect on fecundability in Taiwan cannot be (completely) attributed to omission of births that died. Their analysis was conducted using vital statistics registration data, and is therefore not susceptible to event displacement through memory error. Overall, however, we can neither accept nor...
Journal Article
Demography (2007) 44 (2): 427–440.
Published: 01 May 2007
... . Griffin , D. , & Moriarity , C. ( 1992 ). Characteristics of Census Errors . Washington, DC : U.S. Census Bureau . Hainer , P. ( 1987 ). A Brief and Qualitative Study Exploring the Reasons for Census Coverage Error Among Low Income Black Households . Washington, DC : Census...