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Neonatal Mortality

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Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (3): 477–488.
Published: 01 August 1993
...Elizabeth Zenger Abstract This paper studies the familial association of neonatal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh and its relationship to birth-spacing effects on mortality. Findings show that familial association is strongest for siblings of adjacent birth orders. Moreover, birth-spacing effects...
Journal Article
Demography (1982) 19 (3): 371–389.
Published: 01 August 1982
.... In this set of circumstances, it is understandable that they will make allocative decisions that will affect the survival probabilities of children. These decisions and the environmental influences on mortality are the basic forces which determine whether a child will survive through the post-neonatal period...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (5): 1705–1726.
Published: 10 September 2020
... primarily from household surveys. We conducted a validation study of survey data on neonatal mortality in Guinea-Bissau (West Africa). We used records from an urban health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS) that monitors child survival prospectively as our reference data set. We selected...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (6): 2089–2115.
Published: 01 December 2021
...Benjamin Sosnaud Abstract The U.S. Black neonatal mortality rate is more than twice the White rate. This dramatic disparity can be decomposed into two components: (1) disparities due to differences in the distribution of birth weights, and (2) disparities due to differences in birth weight–specific...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Includes: Supplementary data
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Published: 20 August 2018
Fig. 3 Estimated marginal effects: Predicted neonatal mortality rate by female political representation, extent of democratic institutionalization, and various indicators of economic and social development with other covariates held at their means More
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Published: 10 September 2020
Fig. 2 Trends in neonatal mortality rate in urban areas of Guinea-Bissau. The MICS estimates pertain to all urban areas nationwide. The horizontal dashed lines are not confidence intervals but instead reflect the periods for which the estimate was calculated (i.e., the past five years prior More
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Published: 10 September 2020
Fig. 5 Effects of reporting errors on survey estimates of the neonatal mortality rate. We use the mathematical model described in section 1 of the online appendix along with data from England and Wales (described in section 2 of the online appendix ) to calculate the survey estimates More
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 1 Black and White neonatal mortality rates in 33 states, 1995–2010 Fig. 1 Black and White neonatal mortality rates in 33 states, 1995–2010 More
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 2 Decomposition of Black–White disparities in neonatal mortality in 33 states, 1995–2010. The gray bars represent 95% confidence intervals. The horizontal orange line shows the number of deaths per 1,000 live births due to Black–White differences in birth weight–specific mortality More
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 3 Percentage of the Black–White disparity in neonatal mortality explained by differences in birth weight–specific mortality in 33 states, 1995–2010. Darker shades of orange represent higher percentages. Fig. 3 Percentage of the Black–White disparity in neonatal mortality explained More
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Published: 01 December 2021
Fig. 5 Decomposition of Black–White disparities in neonatal mortality in 33 states among highly educated, married mothers, 1995–2010. The gray bars represent 95% confidence intervals. The horizontal orange line shows the number of deaths per 1,000 live births due to Black–White differences More
Journal Article
Demography (1993) 30 (3): 459–475.
Published: 01 August 1993
...J. Ties Boerma; George Stroh Abstract Demographic and health surveys are a useful source of information on the levels and trends of neonatal mortality in developing countries. Such surveys provide data on mortality occurring at 4–14 days of life, which is a sensitive indicator of neonatal tetanus...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (5): 1681–1704.
Published: 08 September 2020
... explores patterns of association between the three factors and mortality occurring in the neonatal and postneonatal periods. Because household-level deprivation might capture some unmeasured characteristics at the community level, such as area-specific investments, this study decomposes household-level...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (4): 603–615.
Published: 01 November 1972
... mortality differential. A comparative approach based on aggregate measures of socioeconomic differentiation is utilized to compare sixty-one United States urban places. Path analysis shows that neonatal mortality differentiation is virtually unaffected by socioeconomic differentials while decreased racial...
Journal Article
Demography (1975) 12 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 February 1975
... and the country as a whole. The ratios of black to white infant mortality rates and Fein’s “time-lag” statistics are used as measures of the extent of black-white differentials. The gaps between blacks and whites in both neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates have widened in the Southern states between 1940...
Journal Article
Demography (1990) 27 (3): 457–466.
Published: 01 August 1990
...Arline T. Geronimus; John Bound Abstract Maternal-age-specific neonatal mortality risk differs by race, with the mid-20s risk low for whites but not blacks. This may be partially due to worsening health for black relative to white women. We analyzed deaths to young women in the aggregate...
Journal Article
Demography (1971) 8 (4): 541–548.
Published: 01 November 1971
... in the relative male risk and sex ratio of early neonatal mortality. As a result, no clear and consistent trend in the relative male risk or sex ratio of perinatal mortality can be detected. It is suggested that improvements in obstetric practice or in registration effectiveness may be responsible...
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (4): 695–713.
Published: 01 November 1981
... for low-income women, maternal and infant care projects, and the legalization of abortion. The most striking finding is that the increase in the legal abortion rate is the single most important factor in reductions in both white and nonwhite neonatal mortality rates. Not only does the growth in abortion...
Journal Article
Demography (1987) 24 (2): 229–244.
Published: 01 May 1987
...: the neonatal mortality rate, the percentage of low-weight births, and the percentage of preterm births. All three are race specific and all pertain to large counties in the United States in 1977. The results suggest that by preventing unwanted births, abortion enhances the survivability of newborns of a given...
Journal Article
Demography (1984) 21 (3): 361–372.
Published: 01 August 1984
... of neonatal mortality rates using our method are presented as an example. 12 1 2011 © Population Association of America 1984 1984 Decomposition Method Specific Rate Neonatal Mortality Rate Crude Birth Rate Crude Rate References Armstrong, R. J. 1973.A Study of Infant Mortality...