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Mortality Index

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Published: 03 October 2014
Fig. 1 Mortality index ( ) of each country (1950–2007) More
Image
Published: 03 October 2014
Fig. 1 Mortality index ( ) of each country (1950–2007) More
Journal Article
Demography (1968) 5 (1): 354–361.
Published: 01 March 1968
... The possibility of constructing a mortality index from age data suggested the hypothesis that mortality is directly related to the fertility ratio and inversely related to the percentage of old persons. The measures of mortality selected were life expectations at birth, at one year, and at five years. A sample...
Journal Article
Demography (1970) 7 (3): 317–324.
Published: 01 August 1970
...Robert Schoen Abstract Even though a single summary index of mortality can never replace the set of age-specific death rates, it has been found to be extremely useful for a wide variety of purposes. Such indexes are generally one of two types: aggregative indexes, such as directly standardized...
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (1): 98–107.
Published: 01 March 1967
... their urban mortality. Since available statistics generally show the contrary, a way is presented for constructing possible means of sub-registering vital statistics in some areas of these countries. The index would vary to agree with the system of the registry of vital statistics in a given area. Mexico...
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (3): 1131–1159.
Published: 28 May 2019
... of mortality rates. The basic structure is log( m x ) = (mean model) + (residual model), with the final form 2 where i is age, j is period, k = ( j – i ) indexes cohorts, f is logged age- and period-specific mortality (log( m )), α is an age effect, β is a period effect, the sum ∑ m...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Includes: Supplementary data
Image
Published: 17 September 2013
Fig. 2 The sensitivity of each index with respect to mortality change at different ages. The sensitivities were standardized to the value of each index (i.e., ) to make them comparable. Note the difference in scale between the top and bottom panels, plotted separately to more clearly More
Image
Published: 17 September 2013
Fig. 2 The sensitivity of each index with respect to mortality change at different ages. The sensitivities were standardized to the value of each index (i.e., ) to make them comparable. Note the difference in scale between the top and bottom panels, plotted separately to more clearly More
Image
Published: 17 September 2013
Fig. 3 The proportional change in the index from a 1 % change in mortality at each age on the x -axis. The first five ages were plotted separately in the top panel to more clearly delineate behavior of the indices at early and later ages. French males, period life table data from the Human More
Image
Published: 22 May 2020
Fig. 2 White infant mortality disadvantage index (IMDI), standardized effects, 1983–2013. <12 years = less than 12 years of education; 12+ years = at least 12 years of education; IMR = infant mortality rates. We note a few most important factors. From 1983 to 2006, the increasing nonmarital More
Image
Published: 22 May 2020
Fig. 3 Black infant mortality disadvantage index (IMDI), standardized effects, 1983–2013. <12 years = less than 12 years of education; 12+ years = at least 12 years of education; IMR = infant mortality rates. We note a few most important factors. From 1983 to 2013, Black women’s declining More
Image
Published: 01 October 2021
Fig. 2 Effect of mother's age at birth of index child on under-5 mortality Fig. 2 Effect of mother's age at birth of index child on under-5 mortality More
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (3): 1073–1095.
Published: 18 May 2017
...Hong Li; Johnny Siu-Hang Li Abstract Researchers using the Lee-Carter approach have often assumed that the time-varying index evolves linearly and that the parameters describing the age pattern of mortality decline are time-invariant. However, as several empirical studies suggest, the two...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (5): 1755–1773.
Published: 03 October 2014
...Fig. 1 Mortality index ( ) of each country (1950–2007) ...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1964) 1 (1): 296–315.
Published: 01 March 1964
... of Mor- tality," chap. iv in Vital Statistics Rates in the United States, 1900-1940, by Forrest E. Linder and Robert D. Grove (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1943); Peter R. Cox, Demogra- phy, chap. vii (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1950); J. Yerushalmy, "A Mortality Index for Use...
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (6): 2001–2024.
Published: 01 November 2017
... among Hispanics, often called the “Hispanic paradox.” Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men matched to death records in both the U.S. Vital Statistics system and the Social Security Death Index, we demonstrate that even small rates of missing mortality matching plausibly lead...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (3): 979–1005.
Published: 22 May 2020
...Fig. 2 White infant mortality disadvantage index (IMDI), standardized effects, 1983–2013. <12 years = less than 12 years of education; 12+ years = at least 12 years of education; IMR = infant mortality rates. We note a few most important factors. From 1983 to 2006, the increasing nonmarital...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1969) 6 (4): 425–433.
Published: 01 November 1969
... a hypothesis of gross underregistration of live born infants in other countries. The results indicate that some index of physical development (birth weight, gestation, or a combination of both) should be included in any appraisal of infant mortality. DEMOGRAPHY Volume 6, Number 4 November 1969 REGISTRATION...
Journal Article
Demography (2013) 50 (5): 1615–1640.
Published: 17 September 2013
...Fig. 2 The sensitivity of each index with respect to mortality change at different ages. The sensitivities were standardized to the value of each index (i.e., ) to make them comparable. Note the difference in scale between the top and bottom panels, plotted separately to more clearly...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2010) 47 (1): 79–96.
Published: 01 February 2010
...Malena Monteverde; Kenya Noronha; Alberto Palloni; Beatriz Novak Abstract Increasing levels of obesity could compromise future gains in life expectancy in low-and high-income countries. Although excess mortality associated with obesity and, more generally, higher levels of body mass index (BMI...