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Maternal Work

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Journal Article
Demography (2008) 45 (1): 31–53.
Published: 01 February 2008
...Lisa A. Gennetian; Leonard M. Lopoo; Andrew S. London Abstract We examine how changes in maternal work hours affect adolescent children’s school participation and performance outcomes using data from interviews in 1998 and 2001 with approximately 1,700 women who, in May 1995, were welfare-reliant...
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Published: 01 June 2021
Fig. 2 Predicted active childcare minutes by maternal education and work status in 2003–2005 and 2015–2017. For full-time workers in 2003–2005, there were statistical differences (at p <  .05) between those with a college degree or more and the other education groups; there were also More
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (2): 559–576.
Published: 08 April 2020
... for children. We investigate this (potential) double burden and its effect on maternal health later in life. When designing public policies aimed at increased fertility rates and/or increased female labor supply, any negative health consequences of family and work have to be taken into account. In the United...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (5): 1867–1894.
Published: 04 October 2014
...” of time. On average, maternal work has no effect on time in activities that positively influence children’s development, but it reduces time in types of activities that may be detrimental to children’s development. Stratification by mothers’ education reveals that although all children, regardless...
Journal Article
Demography (2023) 60 (6): 1791–1813.
Published: 01 December 2023
... underscore the importance of considering quality, and not just quantity, in assessing the effects of maternal work-incentive policies on parenting and children's home environments. Copyright © 2023 The Authors 2023 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons license...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2012) 49 (2): 747–772.
Published: 14 January 2012
... exhibit fewer behavior problems when mothers work and experience job stability (relative to children whose mothers do not work). In contrast, maternal work accompanied by job instability is associated with significantly higher child behavior problems (relative to employment in a stable job). Children...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (3): 813–833.
Published: 13 May 2019
... with the paternal grandmother is at least 8.6 percentage points higher if the firstborn is a boy. At the same time, maternal labor supply increases by 2.9 days per month. By contrast, for educated mothers, the propensity for coresidence is higher, the working hours are longer, and the impact of the child’s sex...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2007) 44 (2): 307–333.
Published: 01 May 2007
...Rachel A. Gordon; Robert Kaestner; Sanders Korenman Abstract This article presents estimates of effects of maternal paid work and nonmaternal child care on injuries and infectious disease for children aged 12 to 36 months. Mother-child fixed-effects estimates are obtained by using data from...
Journal Article
Demography (2001) 38 (3): 423–436.
Published: 01 August 2001
...- graphic change, related to that change, or some combination of the two. Regardless of maternal work and marital status, mothers and fathers may spend more time with children be- cause of cultural changes in child-rearing values, which em- phasize the importance of child development (Alwin 1996). Another...
Journal Article
Demography (2005) 42 (2): 391–395.
Published: 01 May 2005
..., likely reasons for the larger change, and the implications are discussed. 15 2 2011 © Population Association of America 2005 2005 Parental Time Maternal Employment Time Child Maternal Work Childcare Time References Bianchi , S. ( 2000 ). Maternal Employment and Time...
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (2): 157–171.
Published: 01 May 1999
... between maternal employment and breast-feeding using 1993-1994 data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Infant Feeding Practices Study. We first explore the simultaneous duration of breast-feeding and work leave following childbirth. We find that the duration of leave from work significantly...
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (4): 1223–1248.
Published: 01 August 2021
...—that high-SES daughters growing up in the late twentieth century became more likely than low-SES daughters to be raised by working mothers. This difference in exposure to working mothers, interacted with differential responsiveness of employment status to such exposure, would generate maternal employment...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (1): 285–320.
Published: 14 January 2019
..., elucidating that these characteristics may be associated not only with how much mothers work but also the patterning of their employment. Our results support studying maternal employment as a long-term pattern and employing research approaches that address the qualitative distinctness of these diverse...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1999) 36 (2): 145–155.
Published: 01 May 1999
..., return to the prepregnancy employer was quite common. Sixty percent of women who worked full-time before the birth of a child continued to work for the same employer after the child was born. Furthermore, the labor market behavior of most of the remaining 40% suggests that maternity-leave legislation...
Journal Article
Demography (2018) 55 (2): 587–615.
Published: 08 March 2018
... and Milligan 2010 ; Dustmann and Schönberg 2012 ; Rossin 2011 ), but relatively few studies have investigated potential associations with maternal health (for reviews, see Aitken et al. 2015 ; Staehelin et al. 2007 ). Against the background of a continuously growing share of working mothers, this lack...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (6): 2215–2246.
Published: 01 December 2022
... insecure early temperament. In contrast, mothers' age at childbirth hardly matters for children with a secure disposition. Further analysis indicates that the moderating effect of maternal age cannot be explained by the mother's first-birth timing, education, work status, income, or family stability. Older...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (4): 1349–1370.
Published: 03 July 2019
...Joseph Molitoris; Kieron Barclay; Martin Kolk Abstract A large body of research has found an association between short birth intervals and the risk of infant mortality in developing countries, but recent work on other perinatal outcomes from highly developed countries has called these claims...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (5): 1931–1954.
Published: 01 October 2021
... the potential of increasing both fertility and maternal employment. Using two waves of the Generations and Gender Survey, we show that more paternal involvement in the family increases the likelihood that the mother will have a second child and work full-time. Men's fertility and work decisions are instead...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2012) 49 (1): 1–21.
Published: 26 October 2011
...Jeremy Staff; Jeylan T. Mortimer Abstract Prior research shows that mothers earn lower hourly wages than women without children, and that this maternal wage penalty cannot be fully explained by differences between mothers and other women in work experience and job characteristics. This research...
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Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (3): 1065–1091.
Published: 01 June 2021
...Fig. 2 Predicted active childcare minutes by maternal education and work status in 2003–2005 and 2015–2017. For full-time workers in 2003–2005, there were statistical differences (at p <  .05) between those with a college degree or more and the other education groups; there were also...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data