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Influenza

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Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (5): 1723–1746.
Published: 09 September 2019
...Enrique Acosta; Stacey A. Hallman; Lisa Y. Dillon; Nadine Ouellette; Robert Bourbeau; D. Ann Herring; Kris Inwood; David J. D. Earn; Joaquin Madrenas; Matthew S. Miller; Alain Gagnon Abstract This study examines the roles of age, period, and cohort in influenza mortality trends over the years 1959...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (4): 1389–1425.
Published: 19 July 2019
...Jonas Helgertz; Tommy Bengtsson Abstract The 1918 influenza pandemic had not only a massive instant death toll but also lasting effects on its survivors. Several studies have shown that children born in 1919, and thus exposed to the H1N1 virus in utero , experienced worse health and socioeconomic...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2012) 49 (3): 857–865.
Published: 03 June 2012
...Siddharth Chandra; Goran Kuljanin; Jennifer Wray Abstract Estimates of worldwide mortality from the influenza pandemic of 1918–1919 vary widely, from 15 million to 100 million. In terms of loss of life, India was the focal point of this profound demographic event. In this article, we calculate...
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 5 Three-dimensional perspective of the influenza mortality estimated by the Serfling model applied to P&I mortality data. This section frames ages 20–60 and period 1990–2008, covered by the dashed square in Fig. 4 , panel a. The dashed diagonal line locates the 1968 birth cohort More
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 2 Observed and predicted influenza death counts at age 80, 1997–2016. Between 1998 and 2002, estimates for May–September are not included because there are no influenza circulation data for these periods. More
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 6 Period and cohort relative (to average) risks of influenza-related mortality derived from the Serfling model, ages 5–100, 1959–2016. The bold gray vertical lines highlight birth cohorts where statistically significant changes in slope occur: that is, 1896–1901, 1928–1929, 1947–1948, 1956 More
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 4 Lexis surfaces of influenza mortality rates estimated by the Serfling model, 1959–2016 (panel a) and the Surveillance-Serfling model, 1997–2016 (panel b). The vertical arrows a, b, d, and e indicate periods of severe H3N2 epidemics. Arrow c marks the reappearance of H1N1 (1977–1978 More
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 3 Serfling estimates of monthly influenza death counts (panel a) and of influenza death counts using the total U.S. population in 2015 as the standard population (panel b) More
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Published: 03 June 2012
Fig. 1 Comparison of population loss in the unrestricted influenza model with the restricted model of Davis ( 1951 ): Data from all six censuses More
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Published: 03 June 2012
Fig. 2 Comparison of population loss in the unrestricted influenza model with the restricted model of Davis ( 1951 ): 1891 census data dropped More
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (5): 1855–1874.
Published: 29 July 2019
... to the next generation. Our study uses representative survey data from the United States to trace the impacts of in utero exposure to the 1918 influenza pandemic on the outcomes of the children and grandchildren of those affected. We find evidence of multigenerational effects on educational, economic...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2006) 43 (4): 647–657.
Published: 01 November 2006
... LE from annual life tables are better measures than those based on the mixed methods detailed in NCHS reports. Estimates from life tables show that the impact of the 1918 influenza pandemic on LE was much smaller than indicated by official statistics. We conclude that NCHS should report official...
Journal Article
Demography (1994) 31 (2): 271–296.
Published: 01 May 1994
... 1994 1994 Influenza Degenerative Disease Disease Mortality Mortality Decline Cumulative Hazard References Behm H. , & Vallin J. ( 1982 ). “Mortality Differentials among Human Groups.” . In S.H. Preston (Ed.), Biological and Social Aspects of Mortality and...
Journal Article
Demography (1977) 14 (4): 411–418.
Published: 01 November 1977
... © Population Association of America 1977 1977 Influenza Life Table Crude Death Rate Percent Improvement Stationary Death Rate References Demetrius , L. ( 1976 ). Measures of Variability in Age-Structured Populations . Journal of Theoretical Biology , 63 , 397 – 404 . 10.1016/0022...
Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 115–125.
Published: 01 March 1965
.... Si bien la causa principal de esta situación son las enfermedades cardiovasculares y renales, no mejoraron reduciendo la mortalidad o disminuyendo la tasa de aumento, ni la influenza ni la pneumonia. Deniro de las grandes categorias de causas de defunción—como las enfermedades cardiovasculares y...
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Published: 09 September 2019
Fig. 1 Monthly observed P&I death counts and baseline mortality (without influenza activity) predicted by the Serfling model at age 80, 1959–2016 More
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Published: 20 November 2019
Fig. 2 Decomposition of five-year change in the sex gap in life expectancy at birth for selected countries, 1880–1884 to 2005–2009. Because the sex gap for England and Wales and for France is highly perturbed by the two world wars and the Spanish influenza epidemic, affected years are not shown More
Journal Article
Demography (1982) 19 (4): 527–547.
Published: 01 November 1982
... we em- ploy in defining 12causes of death which we will use for tabulation. Except for the category (1) relating to infectious compli- cations (' 'influenza/pneumonia," includ- ing septicemia), all are considered chron- ic diseases. Two categories of neoplasms are defined in Table 1. The first of...
Journal Article
Demography (2019) 56 (6): 2307–2321.
Published: 20 November 2019
...Fig. 2 Decomposition of five-year change in the sex gap in life expectancy at birth for selected countries, 1880–1884 to 2005–2009. Because the sex gap for England and Wales and for France is highly perturbed by the two world wars and the Spanish influenza epidemic, affected years are not shown...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1983) 20 (1): 27–43.
Published: 01 February 1983
... those char- acterized by high levels of mortality from acute diseases-infectious and parasitic diseases and influenza/pneumonialbron- chitis-to those dominated by mortality from chronic conditions--cardiovascular diseases and cancer (Preston, 1976). An alternate expectation is that as cause of death...