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Host Society

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Journal Article
Demography (2014) 51 (2): 645–671.
Published: 08 January 2014
..., such as an individual’s cognitive ability or willingness to integrate. Clearly, immigrants who want to integrate into the host society and have a greater ability to learn the language will be more likely to live among natives than are immigrants who are less willing or able. In Eq. ( 1 ), such unobservable factors were...
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Journal Article
Demography (2004) 41 (4): 721–738.
Published: 01 November 2004
... durations. 14 1 2011 © Population Association of America 2004 2004 Current Population Survey Return Migration Host Society Concrete Event Wage Regression References Alba R. , & Nee V. ( 2003 ). Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary...
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (1): 201–229.
Published: 04 January 2017
... members in their host societies. To highlight the challenges faced by childhood immigrants, researchers have labeled them the “1.5 immigrant generation” to differentiate their experiences from those of (first-generation) immigrants arriving as adults and their native-born children in the second...
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Demography (2011) 48 (1): 49–72.
Published: 03 February 2011
.... Immigrants Parental home Transition to adulthood This historical background reflects the socioeconomic position of these groups and their cultural distance from the host society. Surinamese and Antillean ( Caribbean ) migrants often speak Dutch and adopt cultural norms similar to those of the Dutch...
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Journal Article
Demography (1965) 2 (1): 549–566.
Published: 01 March 1965
..., Assimilation in American Life (New York: Oxford University Press, 1946), pp. 70-75. "Cultural" implies change of cultural patterns to those of host society; "structural," large-scale entrance into cliques, clubs, and insti- tutions of host society; "marital," large-scale intermarriage; "identificational...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (1): 297–322.
Published: 07 February 2020
..., such as selection, disruption, and adaptation. These processes alter fertility outcomes and typically result in fertility levels between that of the home and host society (e.g., Abbasi-Shavazi et al. 2015 ; Carter 2000 ; Chattopadhyay et al. 2006 ; Choi 2014 ; Ford 1990 ; Milewski 2010 ; Ng and Nault 1997...
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Journal Article
Demography (2024) 61 (2): 569–593.
Published: 01 April 2024
... migrants during their stay in the host society and following their return to their country of origin. A vast body of literature has explored migrants’ fertility patterns ( Kulu 2005 ; Milewski 2007 ), typically by comparing migrants with the majority population in the host society ( Kulu et al. 2017...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2010) 47 (4): 869–893.
Published: 01 November 2010
... 1921). Milton Gordon, in his well-known Assimilation in American Life (1964), provided an analytical synthesis of assimilation theory and concepts. He argued that the assimilation process ¿ rst involves acculturation, wherein minority group members adopt the cultural patterns of the host society...
Journal Article
Demography (2008) 45 (3): 651–671.
Published: 01 August 2008
... their life chances within given human capital, social network, and institutional constraints. As such, assimilation can occur both among immigrants themselves with added time in the host society and across generations (Alba and Nee 2003; Brubaker 2001). Assimilation is a multifaceted concept, however...
Journal Article
Demography (1994) 31 (3): 525–548.
Published: 01 August 1994
... tends to signal a long-term commitment to the host society, whereas emigration indicates that immigrants are no longer attached to the host country. On the other hand, for the purpose of comparing behaviors in different immigrant groups, the extent to which immigrants emigrate can have important...
Journal Article
Demography (2001) 38 (3): 317–336.
Published: 01 August 2001
... and the recognition that tem- poral change in one dimension did not lead immediately (or inevitably) to change in others. Some aspects of assimilation, such as language acquisition and familiarity with local cul- ture, may be a direct result of exposure or experiences in the host society. These outcomes are partially...
Journal Article
Demography (2006) 43 (3): 511–536.
Published: 01 August 2006
... of California Press . Reitz , J. ( 2002 ). Host Societies and the Reception of Immigrants: Research Themes, Emerging Theories, and Methodological Issues . International Migration Review , 36 , 1005 – 19 . 10.1111/j.1747-7379.2002.tb00115.x Rivera-Batiz , L. Francisco , & Santiago...
Journal Article
Demography (2017) 54 (1): 231–257.
Published: 03 January 2017
... of failure (Stutzer 2004 ). Unlike natives, immigrants have relocated to another country, often with the hope of building better lives. This hope implies that success in the host society outweighs the costs of emigration in terms of disrupting social ties and the costs of immigration in terms of adapting...
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Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (1): 247–266.
Published: 01 February 2022
...: Linking sending and host societies . Population, Space and Place , 25 , e2231 . https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2231 Wang S. , & Morav L. ( 2021 ). Participation in civil society organizations and ethnic minorities' interethnic friendships in Britain . British Journal of Sociology...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2003) 40 (4): 759–783.
Published: 01 November 2003
... and Rumbaut 2001; Zhou 1997). This orientation sug- gests that adaptation in the host society varies such that there is a net disadvantage for some immigrants or a net advantage for others that is not accounted for by compositional characteristics (Kao, Tienda, and Schneider 1996). In this perspective...
Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (3): 989–1015.
Published: 08 May 2015
... social capital for migration. Empirically, we analyze the relative importance of strong and weak ties to men and women for the odds of migration. We also consider the effects of frequency of trips and duration of stay in the host country as well as the volume of household and community ties to migrants...
Journal Article
Demography (2016) 53 (6): 2005–2030.
Published: 15 November 2016
.... Migrants are thus likely to engage in medical returns upon becoming ill in the host society (Bastida et al. 2008 ; Fong 2008 ; Wallace et al. 2009 ). Given the recent adoption of universal health coverage in Mexico, medical returns may be an increasingly relevant mechanism of return in the current...
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Journal Article
Demography (2015) 52 (2): 485–511.
Published: 26 February 2015
... 2015 © Population Association of America 2015 2015 Immigrants Poverty Female employment Ethnic diversity Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada Immigrant families are economically vulnerable for a variety of reasons, including lower educational attainment, poor host-country...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2001) 38 (3): 375–389.
Published: 01 August 2001
... capital within an immigrant commu- nity will affect the transmission of information regarding welfare use and its alternatives. Immigrants may know little about public programs in the host society; information gained through contact with co-ethnics may be crucial for their participation in welfare...
Journal Article
Demography (1989) 26 (1): 1–14.
Published: 01 February 1989
... to an entirely different cultural and social milieu can carry with it built-in protection against such a substitution process and ensure that the original reference group continues to be the relevant reference group. By locating themselves in a host community distinct from their own, migrants are less likely...