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Fourth Model

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Published: 27 September 2018
Fig. 7 Comparison of three models sources of change by age with reported data for populations born in Australia and China, 2006–2011. First bar = reported, second bar = Model 1, third bar = Model 2, fourth bar = Model 3 More
Image
Published: 27 September 2018
Fig. 7 Comparison of three models sources of change by age with reported data for populations born in Australia and China, 2006–2011. First bar = reported, second bar = Model 1, third bar = Model 2, fourth bar = Model 3 More
Journal Article
Demography (1990) 27 (2): 233–250.
Published: 01 May 1990
... the proportion of persons who never marry or who are divorced, the higher the resulting death rates. 13 1 2011 15 4 1989 15 8 1989 © Population Association of America 1990 1990 Marital Status Excess Mortality Single Person Mortality Differential Fourth Model References...
Journal Article
Demography (1981) 18 (3): 267–285.
Published: 01 August 1981
... intention; (2) this certainty, like more firm intentions, varies by age and parity as the model predicts; and (3) there were significant shifts in the level of certainty between 1965 and 1970. Specifically, while intentions for third, fourth, and fifth births declined, more women "didn't know...
Journal Article
Demography (1972) 9 (1): 13–33.
Published: 01 February 1972
... of their hinterlands very well, but the best fitting models suggest that population density declines by distance accord- ing to an exponential function to the base e, percent urban declines accord- ing to a function to the one-fourth power, sex ratio declines for about 100 kilometers and then increases according...
Journal Article
Demography (2020) 57 (2): 599–626.
Published: 14 February 2020
... and pairwise comparisons from logistic regression models before and after adjustment for demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and depression. Overall, findings reveal some important similarities and differences in the relationships between marital status and health by sexual...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (1967) 4 (2): 850–858.
Published: 01 June 1967
... to add to 100 percent. We investigate how frequently this failure occurs and what the distributions of sums of rounded percentages are for (1) an empirical set of data, (2) the multinomial distribution in small samples, (3) spacings between points dropped on an interval—the broken-stick model—; and (4...
Journal Article
Demography (2021) 58 (1): 383–391.
Published: 01 February 2021
... the first three sections focus on specific items related to framing, selection bias, and endogeneity, the fourth and final section tackles a more substantive theoretical debate between Stark and me over how to conceptualize the New Economics of Labor Migration framework in relation to gender. In my original...
Journal Article
Demography (2008) 45 (3): 693–717.
Published: 01 August 2008
... use two-stage least squares (2SLS) or binary probit models. Although, in general, ordered 21. About three-fourths of women in the IFLS sample reported no miscarriages. At the high end, about 7% reported that more than 20% of their total number of pregnancies ended in miscarriage. A possible...
Image
Published: 12 May 2015
Fig. 4 Model fit for fertility by age to 2009 data (top row), forecasts for 2024 (second row), model fit and forecasts of TFR based on the full data set (third row), and 1975–2000 truncated data set (fourth row) More
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Published: 12 May 2015
Fig. 3 Model fit for mortality by age to 2009 data for females (top row), forecasts for 2024 (second row), model fit and forecasts of life expectancy based on the full data set (third row), and 1975–2000 truncated data set (fourth row) More
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Published: 12 May 2015
Fig. 6 Model fit for female immigration counts by age to 2009 data (first row), forecasts for 2024 (second row), model fit and forecasts of total immigration based on the full data set (third row), and 1975–2000 truncated data set (fourth row) More
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Published: 12 May 2015
Fig. 5 Model fit for female emigration rates by age to 2009 data (first row), forecasts for 2024 (second row), model fit and forecasts of overall mean emigration rate based on the full data set (third row), and 1975–2000 truncated data set (fourth row) More
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Published: 01 April 2024
Fig. 1 Predicted probability of nominating ≥ 1 natives (fourth-plus generation) as best friends, by generation and country of residence. Predicted probabilities are based on estimates from separate logistic regressions for each country of residence using baseline and adjusted models More
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Published: 01 April 2024
Fig. 2 Predicted probability of nominating ≥ 1 natives (fourth-plus generation) as best friends, by generation, ethnic origin, and country of residence. Predicted probabilities are based on estimates from separate logistic regressions for each country of residence using baseline More
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Published: 13 January 2017
Fig. 6 Predicted probabilities of employment by gender, race, and sector. Author’s calculations using data from the CPS-MORG supplements. Shaded areas represent 95 % confidence intervals. Models include controls for education, age, marital status, occupation, interactions between year and race More
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Published: 13 January 2017
Fig. 4 Predicted probabilities of unemployment by sex and race for public sector workers, 2000–2013. Author’s calculations using data from the CPS-MORG supplements. Shaded areas represent 95 % confidence intervals. Models include controls for education, age, marital status, occupation More
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Published: 13 January 2017
Fig. 5 Predicted probabilities of employment by sex and race for public sector workers, 2003–2013. Author’s calculations using data from the CPS-MORG supplements. Shaded areas represent 95 % confidence intervals. Models include controls for education, age, marital status, occupation More
Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (3): 895–920.
Published: 01 June 2022
... and begin childbearing. Fourth, religiosity was measured only at baseline in the RDSL. While this allows us to model women's behavior after assessing their religiosity—a substantial improvement over past research ( Pearce et al. 2019 )—it prevents us from exploring the reverse. To the extent that premarital...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Demography (2022) 59 (5): 1763–1789.
Published: 01 October 2022
... in census tracts with participants of the other race (i.e., Black or White, n  = 674), and the fourth models assess Black–White differences for youth living in the same census tract by controlling for home census tract fixed effects. We then turn to models assessing whether Black–White differences...
FIGURES
Includes: Supplementary data